Underside hull paint and engine compartment paint

C

Craig

Guest
Is there a proper color code for under side hull paint or just plain
jane Simi Gloss black?

What about the thick coating in and around the engine compartment. Is
it worth while to try to duplicate that or just use the sound deading
kit from Gord?
 
J

John Friese

Guest
Craig,

Semi Gloss black on the underside is just fine. On the inside I
prefer to use a commercial mastic coating like Dupont Corlar 25P.
It's like a thick paint that you can even roller on to give it a
thickness that resembles the original Amphicar interior coating. It
comes in colors and can be custom blended to make it whatever color
you want, though I found two off the shelf colors worked great for my
two cars. It doesn't require a primer and isn't UV sensitive. It was
one of the best tips I ever got on Amphicar restoration and it came
from Billy Syx of East Coast Amphicar. It's an epoxy, two part
material that comes in what they call a 1 gallon size but that's
actually 2 gallons since you mix it 50/50 with it's hardener material.
Two gallons is just right for coating the whole back end up to the
fins, the middle section up to the top and the front section up to the
cross member under the spare tire. The inside of the front trunk area
is best painted with a marine top side paint mixed with as much
flattening agent as it will take. The flatter finish in the upper
trunk area hides minor sins.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red



--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "Craig" <taylorcm@...> wrote:
>
> Is there a proper color code for under side hull paint or just plain
> jane Simi Gloss black?
>
> What about the thick coating in and around the engine compartment. Is
> it worth while to try to duplicate that or just use the sound deading
> kit from Gord?
>
 
A

a_colo_native

Guest
--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "Craig" <taylorcm@...> wrote:
>
> Is there a proper color code for under side hull paint or just plain
> jane Simi Gloss black?
>
> What about the thick coating in and around the engine compartment.
Is
> it worth while to try to duplicate that or just use the sound
deading
> kit from Gord?
>

Go with John F's advice on the mastic. The proper color for the bottom
is really a satin black which is slightly less glossy than semi-gloss.
There is a truck bed undercoating that works very well for this. The
can has a blue and white label and I have found it at Auto-Zone,
Checker and Wal-Mart for about $7 a can. 3 or 4 will do the underside
and it helps seal and protect the bottom. It has a very slight texture
to it.

John Bevins
 
A

Alaskan Amphi

Guest
How about a spray on bed liner product? Something like the Line-x or
Rhino liner brand for the underside. I'd guess it could be done in a
Satin black and with out the non skid stuff they use in pick up bed
liners. That would give the under side a bit more durability for the
occasional underwater obstacle.

Craig in Alaska
 
L

Larry & Nancy Solheim

Guest
Re: Re: Underside hull paint and engine compartment paint

We did that on MetalBeast (a '64 I restored), Craig. It turned out quite nicely. --Larry

Alaskan Amphi <taylorcm@alyeska-pipeline.com> wrote: <blockquote class="replbq" style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid"> <div id="ygrp-text"> How about a spray on bed liner product? Something like the Line-x or
Rhino liner brand for the underside. I'd guess it could be done in a
Satin black and with out the non skid stuff they use in pick up bed
liners. That would give the under side a bit more durability for the
occasional underwater obstacle.

Craig in
Alaska

</blockquote>



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M

Mike Israel

Guest
Re: Re: Underside hull paint and engine compartment paint

<table><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">The advantage to good old fashioned paint is that you will not have to worry about water being trapped underneath and causing considerable unseen damage. Over time, this was the problem experienced with undercoating such as Ziebart. It has also been seen with Por-15. Sure, Ziebart seemed like a great idea at the time but the cure turned out worse than the disease. If you paint starts flaking or bubbling the area is likely to be easily spotted and can be just as easily repaired. The other consideration with any coating is "what will it take to remove it". Several restorers, including some in the Amphi community, have stated that they will add $5,000 to the cost of restoring any car that has
been undercoated. If whatever you put on there can not be easily removed with bead blasting or sanding, stay away from it.
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">
<span style="COLOR: white"><span style="COLOR: white"></span></span>
 
A

a_colo_native

Guest
--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, Mike Israel
<amphicar770@...> wrote:
>
> The advantage to good old fashioned paint is that you will not
have to worry about water being trapped underneath and causing
considerable unseen damage. Over time, this was the problem
experienced with undercoating such as Ziebart... <SNIP>

There are several types of coatings available. The one I use takes
no more effort to remove then paint does and it will adhere as paint
does as long as the surface is prepped properly. That is the key,
careful preparation. Just like quality paint, prepare the surface
properly and it will last for decades.

Rhino lining and the like are not good choices. They are typically
put on very thick and that adds a lot of weight (100+ lbs). The
product I use is only about twice the thickness of paint and had
only a slight texture. The bottom of my white driver over almost 5
years, has 250+ hours in the water and 5500 miles on land. There are
no problem areas anywhere.


John Bevins
 
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