Tranny gear oil

Discussion in 'General Amphicar Discussion' started by martyandcaryl@charter.net, May 29, 2001.

  1. I had a conversation with Nick this morning about how we like using
    Amsoil and then about our Spring Valley S/I with Mr. Wave, to make a
    long story and question short, when I returned home and checked the
    water tranny oil level, it was about ? inch low, and the land tranny
    was more full than when I started. What's going on here, Nick thinks
    there is a seal allowing passage of gear oil between the water tranny
    to the land tranny while in use, Nick has seen this too.
    Marty
    BUOYANT '64 in WI
     
  2. David Chapman
    Offline

    Yes there is a seal, it's around the main shaft and can fail, symptoms are
    as you say. The good news is you don't need to remove the trannie to change
    it, just drain the water box and you can then undo a bolt and remove a cog
    on the end of the main driveshaft, the bad news is there are at least 2
    different types, and one is an incredibly tight fit, broke a couple of my
    pullers and in the end I had to grind it off. Best talk to Hugh, he knows
    about this.

    David Chapman

    >to the land tranny while in use, Nick has seen this too.
     
  3. Marc Schlemmer
    Offline

    I had the same problem with my tranny a couple years ago.....oil finding
    it's way from the water side to the land side. The problem didn't show up
    until I changed to Amsoil. It may just be a coincidence, but that is when I
    noticed the problem.
    I looked at it as proving that Amsoil got places the regular oil
    didn't....and that the problem would have shown up soon anyway, so I didn't
    care nor blame the Amsoil. The benefits of the Amsoil far outweighed having
    to replace the seal (which obviously needed replacing anyway!) Since then,
    Amphi has shifted easier and smoother...even in cold weather...than ever
    before. Amphi shifts as good in January as he does in July.
    As D.C. said....changing the seal in the car worked fine. The only problem
    I had was getting the nut off the end of the main shaft - the whole car
    wanted to roll instead of the nut coming loose. After about an hour of
    trying, finally we used an electric impact wrench. The nut practically
    jumped off! I guess the bang-bang-bang effect is far better than the steady
    pressure of a breaker bar and socket.

    All hail to Amsoil!
    Marc Schlemmer.
     
  4. Bill Connelly
    Offline

    I had a conversation with Nick this morning about how we like using
    Amsoil and then about our Spring Valley S/I with Mr. Wave, to make a
    long story and question short, when I returned home and checked the
    water tranny oil level, it was about ? inch low, and the land tranny
    was more full than when I started. What's going on here, Nick thinks
    there is a seal allowing passage of gear oil between the water tranny
    to the land tranny while in use, Nick has seen this too.
    Marty
    BUOYANT '64 in WI

    =-=-=-=-=-=-

    I also experienced something similar some years ago, particularly after
    really long road trips, like of a few hundred miles or more, but with mine
    it was of oil migrating from the land TO the water tranny instead of vice
    versa. This has since all but ceased as far as I can tell from annual
    tranny oil changes and spot checks after particularly long trips, like to
    the Swim-Ins or to Billy and Randy Syx's place in Jersey from where I live,
    in Virginia. Apart from a really faulty seal, one other likely reason for
    this "lubricant nomadism" I heard from somewhere (Hugh?...at one of the
    Swim-Ins?...I forget) is that it may have had something to do with the
    orientation of the vanes on the filler caps, which would at certain speeds
    direct a torrent of gear oil directly AT the seal. I suppose in my case it
    is quite possible that a seal that otherwise does its job adequately under
    little or no pressure might let a bit trickle past if the pressure of a
    stream of oil were pointed directly at it by the filler cap vanes.
    Nowadays, I always seat the vane flanges (the part that mates with the cap
    top) to match the two grooves on the filler spout, and since then I've had
    no problems, so I suppose I must be doing something right. I was also told
    there were originally painted markings of some sort on the caps to help
    orient them correctly, but any such markings, if they ever existed, are long
    gone on my caps.

    In short, before ripping apart your trannies, you might want to first check
    or experiment with the positioning of the filler caps and, as they say,
    "observe the effect on performance". As for AMSOIL, unlike many other
    standard gear lubes, there's no chlorine in AMSOIL's offerings, so it should
    actually be much kinder to your seals over the long haul.

    ~Bilgemaster~
     
  5. --- In amphicar-lovers@y..., "Bill Connelly" <billiam@e...> wrote:
    > land tranny was more full than when I started. What's going on
    here, Marty
    >
    > =-=-=-=-=-=-
    >
    > I also experienced something similar some years ago, particularly
    after really long road trips, ~Bilgemaster~

    Bill:
    That's a good thought, I will be sure my cap is lined up with the
    notches mating and recheck the oil levels after a few long swims.
    We enjoy the difference Amsoil had made in our Amphi and will
    continue using it here and other vehicles.
    Marty
     
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