Tire Suggestions?

R

rpolcin

Guest
I am looking to replace my original tires with some new ones before I
put it back on the road after restoration. Anyone have suggestions or
comments on which ones to buy or not to buy along with reasons. I'm
currently looking at Coker Tire P165/80R13 STOCK #S79813. I want the
wide white wall look.

Thanks in advance!
 
E

Eric M

Guest
I don't have the Cokers (I'm too cheap) but I did put Goodyear Aquatreads on it. But my mother met Mr. Coker on Vacation in Spain last year. He said anytime she was in Chatanooga to drop by and he'd show us around his colection. Thats the plan from Friday July 6th ... I hear he has some amazing cars. Then I'll try and work a deal on those cokers for myself<g>. Mom's 72 but I told her to wear a nice dress that day ... lol You never know. Eric

rpolcin <rpolcin@yahoo.com> wrote: <blockquote class="replbq" style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">I am looking to replace my original tires with some new ones before I
put it back on the road after restoration. Anyone have suggestions or
comments on which ones to buy or not to buy
along with reasons. I'm
currently looking at Coker Tire P165/80R13 STOCK #S79813. I want the
wide white wall look.

Thanks in advance!




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</blockquote>
 
M

mstrug@juno.com

Guest
Hi: Igot the B.F. Goodrich Silvertowns 185X80-13''. They are made for /by Coker and I bought them from Wallace Wade Antique Tiresover in Dallas.(Same Price Schedule) They ride great and have the 2-7/8'' wide white wall. Spacers are need though. Amphigr66n.
 
R

rlgreen_55

Guest
Having both Coker and Diamondback Classic tires on various old cars
with the DBC's being on amphi I am extremely happy with the DBC. They
are radial however they have the correct 2 1/4" whitewall which
doesn't yellow and is very easy to clean when compared to the Coker.

No complaints with the Coker or Universal tire ride / handling, etc
but the DBC's do handle a little bit better and cleaning the
whitewall's takes a quarter of the time. If you do scuff a whitewall
you can wet sand out the mark very easily.

Ron Green


--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "rpolcin" <rpolcin@...> wrote:
>
> I am looking to replace my original tires with some new ones before
I
> put it back on the road after restoration. Anyone have suggestions
or
> comments on which ones to buy or not to buy along with reasons. I'm
> currently looking at Coker Tire P165/80R13 STOCK #S79813. I want
the
> wide white wall look.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
 
J

John Friese

Guest
Hello,

I have 2 Amphicars and run Coker Classic 165 x 13 bias ply 2.25" wide
white walls on one car. They fit fine with no spacers required and
work fine for me. They are tubeless but I use tubes since I don't
trust the seal along the inside of the Amphicar rims. I've run these
tires for 5 years now and have no complaint with them.

My other car has wide white wall Diamonds Back radials on it and it
works fine too. I barely find any difference in driving between the
two cars. I keep a spare tire in my cars and the radial are wider
tires and the spare won't fit correctly under the trunk floor without
a bit of fooling around with the attaching nut.

John Friese

67 White
67 Red


--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "rpolcin" <rpolcin@...> wrote:
>
> I am looking to replace my original tires with some new ones before I
> put it back on the road after restoration. Anyone have suggestions or
> comments on which ones to buy or not to buy along with reasons. I'm
> currently looking at Coker Tire P165/80R13 STOCK #S79813. I want the
> wide white wall look.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
 
R

Robert & Ina Cabanas

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" bgColor="#ffffff">
<font size="4">What did you use for the spare, John? I need to buy a spare & my tires are Coker. I would like to just get a cheaper, regular tire for the spare. I called Pep Boys & they said they don't carry the Amphicar size & don't think anyone around here will either. I haven't called around yet but since we're all talking about tires I'd like some spare info. Ina in the Boro</font>
<blockquote style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message -----
<div style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: black">From: John Friese
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 12:14 PM
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tire Suggestions?


<div id="ygrp-text">



Hello,

I have 2 Amphicars and run Coker Classic 165 x 13 bias ply 2.25" wide
white walls on one car. They fit fine with no spacers required and
work fine for me. They are tubeless but I use tubes since I don't
trust the seal along the inside of the Amphicar rims. I've run these
tires for 5 years now and have no complaint with them.

My other car has wide white wall Diamonds Back radials on it and it
works fine too. I barely find any difference in driving between the
two cars. I keep a spare tire in my cars and the radial are wider
tires and the spare won't fit correctly under the trunk floor without
a bit of fooling around with the attaching nut.

John Friese

67 White
67 Red

--- In amphicar-lovers@<wbr>yahoogroups.<wbr>com, "rpolcin" <rpolcin@...<wbr>> wrote:
>
> I am looking to replace my original tires with some new ones before I
> put it back on the road after restoration. Anyone have suggestions or
> comments on which ones to buy or not to buy along with reasons. I'm
> currently looking at Coker Tire P165/80R13 STOCK #S79813. I want the
> wide white wall look.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>

</blockquote>
 
G

glennyrosa@comcast.net

Guest
<table>
Just got back from several days on the road and have not looked at any of the several inputs on tire desires. So this is a totally unbias opinion. I may eat my lunch when I read the other comments.

I wanted radials. Found the only ones available came from Coker. Met Coker at our annual swap meet and they don't stock Amphi tires on their truck because they come from Tennessee and they come from Mexico. Anther story. Bottom line is Coker doesn't have Amphi radials on the left coast.

So, I went to Coker direct and got my radial white walls via the East coast via Mexico.

Bottom line, I couldn't have been happier. BUT!!!!!!!!!! My local BFG Tire shop didn't check clearances. My left inner tire wore on the brake line bracket. I found it early and saved the tire.

The Coker BFG white wall radial is a great ride. Just make sure your installer checks the clearances.

I MADE THE MISTAKE FROM ORDERING THESE TIRES DIRECT FROM COKER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

You can get these same tires from Hugh and save a BIG nickel.

Otay,

That's my 2 cents and I shall read the other comments and get my 'whipping'.

RADIALS RULE

600 miles and smiling,

glenn in oregon





<blockquote style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">-------------- Original message --------------
From: "rpolcin" <rpolcin@yahoo.com>

<div id="ygrp-text">


I am looking to replace my original tires with some new ones before I
put it back on the road after restoration. Anyone have suggestions or
comments on which ones to buy or not to buy along with reasons. I'm
currently looking at Coker Tire P165/80R13 STOCK #S79813. I want the
wide white wall look.

Thanks in advance!

</blockquote>
 
J

John Friese

Guest
Ina,

When I restored the car and bought those Coker tires I went "all out"
and bought 5 of them, so the spare is an exact match.

John Friese
White 67
Red 67

--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "Robert & Ina Cabanas"
<ribcab@...> wrote:
>
> What did you use for the spare, John? I need to buy a spare & my
tires are Coker. I would like to just get a cheaper, regular tire for
the spare. I called Pep Boys & they said they don't carry the
Amphicar size & don't think anyone around here will either. I haven't
called around yet but since we're all talking about tires I'd like
some spare info. Ina in the Boro
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: John Friese
> To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 12:14 PM
> Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tire Suggestions?
>
>
>
> Hello,
>
> I have 2 Amphicars and run Coker Classic 165 x 13 bias ply 2.25" wide
> white walls on one car. They fit fine with no spacers required and
> work fine for me. They are tubeless but I use tubes since I don't
> trust the seal along the inside of the Amphicar rims. I've run these
> tires for 5 years now and have no complaint with them.
>
> My other car has wide white wall Diamonds Back radials on it and it
> works fine too. I barely find any difference in driving between the
> two cars. I keep a spare tire in my cars and the radial are wider
> tires and the spare won't fit correctly under the trunk floor without
> a bit of fooling around with the attaching nut.
>
> John Friese
>
> 67 White
> 67 Red
>
> --- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "rpolcin" <rpolcin@> wrote:
> >
> > I am looking to replace my original tires with some new ones
before I
> > put it back on the road after restoration. Anyone have
suggestions or
> > comments on which ones to buy or not to buy along with reasons. I'm
> > currently looking at Coker Tire P165/80R13 STOCK #S79813. I want
the
> > wide white wall look.
> >
> > Thanks in advance!
> >
>
 
D

David Chapman

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

Amphicar 640x13 translates to a radial tyre with the width of a 155 but the
height of a 185.

The ideal solution is a 14 inch wheel with a 155 or 165 tyre on it -
Mercedes did make a suitable 14x5J rim that Amphicar hub cap will fit but
they are difficult to find.

The 185 tyre is wide and causes a few issues. On the back on cars with wider
springs (normally post 1966) it will touch the spring - it can also touch
the brake hose as later cars didn't have the little spring to pull it out of
the way. If you space the tyre out it can then hit the bodywork - and if
someone has used self tappers to replace the side mouldings there is often a
nasty sharp screw in the wheelarch.

In the front the problem is restricted steering lock, if you adjust the
steering stops so the tyre doesn't touch the swing arm you loose a lot which
of course results in difficulty in the water - especially making left turns.
Spacers work better on the front but do make the wheel bearings work harder
and the steering doesn't feel as nice.

Radials do tend to "bend" more and this makes the car more likely to hit
something on really bad slipways. I've been using 175x13 reinforced radials
which are a bit more solid but even so I've bent a few bumper bars and there
is currently a dent in the bodywork around the oil pan. The benefit of these
smaller tyres is it reduces the gearing so the car accelerates a bit
faster - but that also means it hits the rev limit sooner so the speed tops
out at not much over 70mph.

In the 1960s Michelin did make radial tyres in bias sizes and they are
currently setting up a classic tyre division so may start making them again,
however, they would be for European cars so would almost certainly only be
black wall.

David C
 
R

Robert & Ina Cabanas

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" bgColor="#ffffff">
<font size="4">Thanks John. I guess I should have thought about that last year when I ordered the Coker tires. I thought I'd be able to use the ORIGINAL German tire for a spare. When my truck mechanic saw the ORIGINAL Amphicar tire the other day he almost had a heart attack when he heard that I wanted to use it for a spare. I will listen to his advise & get another tire. Thanks. Ina</font>
<blockquote style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message -----
<div style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: black">From: John Friese
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 11:32 AM
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tire Suggestions?


<div id="ygrp-text">


Ina,

When I restored the car and bought those Coker tires I went "all out"
and bought 5 of them, so the spare is an exact match.

John Friese
White 67
Red 67

--- In amphicar-lovers@<wbr>yahoogroups.<wbr>com, "Robert & Ina Cabanas"
<ribcab@...> wrote:
>
> What did you use for the spare, John? I need to buy a spare & my
tires are Coker. I would like to just get a cheaper, regular tire for
the spare. I called Pep Boys & they said they don't carry the
Amphicar size & don't think anyone around here will either. I haven't
called around yet but since we're all talking about tires I'd like
some spare info. Ina in the Boro
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: John Friese
> To: amphicar-lovers@<wbr>yahoogroups.<wbr>com
> Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 12:14 PM
> Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tire Suggestions?
>
>
>
> Hello,
>
> I have 2 Amphicars and run Coker Classic 165 x 13 bias ply 2.25" wide
> white walls on one car. They fit fine with no spacers required and
> work fine for me. They are tubeless but I use tubes since I don't
> trust the seal along the inside of the Amphicar rims. I've run these
> tires for 5 years now and have no complaint with them.
>
> My other car has wide white wall Diamonds Back radials on it and it
> works fine too. I barely find any difference in driving between the
> two cars. I keep a spare tire in my cars and the radial are wider
> tires and the spare won't fit correctly under the trunk floor without
> a bit of fooling around with the attaching nut.
>
> John Friese
>
> 67 White
> 67 Red
>
> --- In amphicar-lovers@<wbr>yahoogroups.<wbr>com, "rpolcin" <rpolcin@> wrote:
> >
> > I am looking to replace my original tires with some new ones
before I
> > put it back on the road after restoration. Anyone have
suggestions or
> > comments on which ones to buy or not to buy along with reasons. I'm
> > currently looking at Coker Tire P165/80R13 STOCK #S79813. I want
the
> > wide white wall look.
> >
> > Thanks in advance!
> >
>

</blockquote>
 
W

WB6WSN

Guest
RE: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" bgColor="#ffffff">
<div dir="ltr" align="left">
<hr tabIndex="-1">
<font face="Tahoma" size="2">From: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert & Ina Cabanas
Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 9:21 PM
To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tire Suggestions?
</font>

<blockquote style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">

<font size="4">Thanks John. I guess I should have thought about that last year when I ordered the Coker tires. I thought I'd be able to use the ORIGINAL German tire for a spare. When my truck mechanic saw the ORIGINAL Amphicar tire the other day he almost had a heart attack when he heard that I wanted to use it for a spare. I will listen to his advise & get another tire. Thanks. Ina<span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#800000"></font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font></blockquote>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">Tire rubber degrades simply by contact with sunlight (UV) and air (O2 & O3).Even if you have decent tread left on an original Vredestein tire, it's still nearly 50 years old! Makes a nice conversation piece, but you should never drive on it.</font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">Spare tires may be a thing of thepast now. The last time I had to use a spare tire was (IIRC) in 1984,on a Chrysler equipped with those flawed 1975 Firestone 500 tires. Once in 23 years seems to be poor justification for hauling around a 50-pound spare tire wherever you go. Besides, the usual failure mode is a slow leak that leaves the tire flat, nottotal physical destruction of the tire. What you most often need is a little air in the tire to get you to a service location (or home). I carry an inflator can for this reason.</font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">For an Amphi, which is typically very low mileage and well maintained, and driven at low speed, I don't think you even need to carry a spare and jack. (Due to serious rust, I replaced my original jacking plates with plain steel panels, so I can't even jack my Amphi the factory way.)</font><font color="#0000ff">Carry an inflation can, but leaving the spare and jack at home will give you a bit less weight in the bow.</font></span></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007">
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">Ed Price</font>
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">El Cajon, CA USA</font>
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">67 Rust Guppy</font>
<div align="left"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span></font>
 
N

nelson625@aol.com

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table id="role_body" style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" bottomMargin="7" leftMargin="7" topMargin="7" rightMargin="7"><font id="role_document" face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2">
Additional Trivia after reading Ed Price's note. Antique cars which get generally minimal use and RV's which likewise often get minimal use considering the time frame that the tires are on the vehicles suffer from tire failure from reasons other than mileage.

I own a 1931 Ford Roadster for which I bought brand new Goodyear (duplicate of OEM's) Tires 2 years ago, and except that the car has been off the road for 2 yearsnow due to more urgent projects, I would have put the new tires on. Model A Fords had a neat feature with the wheels, incidentally - they had what were called "Drop center Rims" so that to change a tire, you took the wheel off the vehicle, then squeezed the 2 beads together and "dropped" the tireinto the center of the rim whereby you could then remove the tire on the opposite side of the rim from the wheel all without using any tools in most cases. Anyway, the story I started to tell was that though I read all the time of the degradation of tires due to oxidation, sunlight and etc, the tires on my Roadster were put on in 1971. Until I stopped driving it 2 years ago with the intention of having it repainted, I regularly drove it at highway speeds of 55 mph. I finally decided this was unwise which is why I bought the replacements. However, in that entire 34 years, the tires required no repairs and served very well. I first saw this car in 1969 and a close personal friend bought it and restored it in 1970-1971 which is why I know it's history so well. It was never rusty even in the rear floor pan. I bought it in 1987 - hard to believe that is now 20 years ago. Anyway, it makes one wonder.

On the other side of the coin, I have thrown rubber tread from RV tires which were in excellent condition to look at them, and were only 5 or 6 years old. Recently, on my1948 Ford Woodie which had 5 beautiful looking wide white wall tires, we embarked on what ended up to be a 700 mile trip in company with 15 other antiques. I examined the tires carefully the day before we left. Though one could detect that they were not new, they had perfect tread and not obvious weathering (of course it is in the garage 98% of the time.) 60 miles into the trip,duringwhich time I had been traveling 45-55 mph, I began throwing rubber from one tire. One cannot simply stop and buy a replacement at a store along the way, so I considered my options. I ended up driving the rest of the 700 miles with the matching unused spare and not exceeding 45 mph which kept the centrifugal force lower, I reasoned. I am now in the process of preparing to acquire new tires- probably Diamond Back Classics from the various information e-mails I have received from Amphi and Woodie friends. However, it is interesting to note the particulars here. I do not know the age of the tires as they did not use standard date codes until fairly recently to my knowledge. These tireswere on the car when I acquired it 10 years ago and may well be 10-20 years older than that. They are also, for what it is worth, Bias Ply tires.

So that is my 2 cents worth of interesting or odd information. Vic Nelson near Daytona</font>


<font style="color: black; font: normal 10pt ARIAL, SAN-SERIF;"><hr style="MARGIN-TOP: 10px">See what's free at AOL.com. </font>
 
R

rlgreen_55

Guest
There is a lot of debate as to how long a tire will last before it
starts deteriorating and is unsafe to use. Obviously if it is exposed
to the sun they won't last near as long. I have a set of Sears 13"
Allstate tires appox 20 years old with less then 500 miles on them
that I wouldn't use on a garden trailer.

Most tire manufactures recommend that tires be changed regardless of
mileage at 8 years. As we know they are in the business to sell tires
and have a huge liability in today's world so that figure may be
closer to 10 or 12 years?

Ron Green




--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, nelson625@... wrote:
>
> Additional Trivia after reading Ed Price's note. Antique cars
which get
> generally minimal use and RV's which likewise often get minimal
use considering
> the time frame that the tires are on the vehicles suffer from tire
failure
> from reasons other than mileage.
>
> I own a 1931 Ford Roadster for which I bought brand new Goodyear
(duplicate
> of OEM's) Tires 2 years ago, and except that the car has been off
the road for
> 2 years now due to more urgent projects, I would have put the new
tires on.
> Model A Fords had a neat feature with the wheels, incidentally -
they had
> what were called "Drop center Rims" so that to change a tire, you
took the
> wheel off the vehicle, then squeezed the 2 beads together
and "dropped" the tire
> into the center of the rim whereby you could then remove the tire
on the
> opposite side of the rim from the wheel all without using any tools
in most
> cases. Anyway, the story I started to tell was that though I read
all the time
> of the degradation of tires due to oxidation, sunlight and etc, the
tires on
> my Roadster were put on in 1971. Until I stopped driving it 2 years
ago with
> the intention of having it repainted, I regularly drove it at
highway speeds of
> 55 mph. I finally decided this was unwise which is why I bought
the
> replacements. However, in that entire 34 years, the tires required
no repairs and
> served very well. I first saw this car in 1969 and a close
personal friend
> bought it and restored it in 1970-1971 which is why I know it's
history so
> well. It was never rusty even in the rear floor pan. I bought it
in 1987 - hard
> to believe that is now 20 years ago. Anyway, it makes one wonder.
>
> On the other side of the coin, I have thrown rubber tread from RV
tires
> which were in excellent condition to look at them, and were only 5
or 6 years
> old. Recently, on my 1948 Ford Woodie which had 5 beautiful
looking wide white
> wall tires, we embarked on what ended up to be a 700 mile trip in
company
> with 15 other antiques. I examined the tires carefully the day
before we left.
> Though one could detect that they were not new, they had perfect
tread and not
> obvious weathering (of course it is in the garage 98% of the time.)
60 miles
> into the trip, during which time I had been traveling 45-55 mph, I
began
> throwing rubber from one tire. One cannot simply stop and buy a
replacement at a
> store along the way, so I considered my options. I ended up
driving the rest
> of the 700 miles with the matching unused spare and not exceeding
45 mph
> which kept the centrifugal force lower, I reasoned. I am now in
the process of
> preparing to acquire new tires- probably Diamond Back Classics
from the
> various information e-mails I have received from Amphi and Woodie
friends. However,
> it is interesting to note the particulars here. I do not know the
age of the
> tires as they did not use standard date codes until fairly
recently to my
> knowledge. These tires were on the car when I acquired it 10 years
ago and may
> well be 10-20 years older than that. They are also, for what it is
worth,
> Bias Ply tires.
>
> So that is my 2 cents worth of interesting or odd information.
Vic Nelson
> near Daytona
>
>
>
> ************************************** See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.
>
 
B

Bill Connelly

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

Just my two-center addition to the topic of tire life: According to
several maintenance-related postings I've seen on various RV lists that
I also subscribe to, posted by folks who face a similar
low-mileage-but-long-life tire situation as most Amphi owners, many
recommend treating the tire sidewalls to an occasional spritz of
Armorall protectant spray to help keep those destructive UV rays at
bay.

One also supposes that pumping up the tires with a less 'reactive'
medium than that gaseous cocktail that is our regular atmosphere might
also help keep one's rubber from rotting from within (i.e. reacting with
its oxygen), or at least slow down the decay somewhat. Many tire shops
nowadays, including CostCo, offer a special nitrogen inflation service
for just a couple of bucks. Apparently, nitrogen, being mostly inert in
its pure diatomic molecular state, won't chew away at those rubber
molecules like the ratty old ravenous oxygen that makes up about 20% of
the stuff we huff and puff. Also, it is said that since pure nitrogen
is the 'fat ass' of gases, it won't leak (i.e. squeeze out) of the tires
as easily. I don't know about the soundness of that claim, since our
atmosphere is already, after all, nearly 80% nitrogen anyhow, but that's
what many folks claim, albeit these folks just coincidentally seem often
to be involved somehow in the sale and marketing of nitrogen tire
inflation equipment and services. I guess the bottom line is that it
seems it really couldn't hurt, and while removing that more reactive
oxygen from one's tires may not really matter much in your daily driver,
whose rubber's gonna get changed every couple-few years anyhow, it might
help squeeze a few extra years of safe service out of those Amphi, RV,
trailer or other expensive collector car tires that are likelier to
decay first than wear away. I might even consider pumping my own Amphi
and RV's wheels up with that fat N2 next time I swing by the CostCo and
their tire department isn't crammed as full as the set of ''Logan's
Run".

For more information on the whole Nitrogen inflation thing that doesn't
appear to be directly involved in selling it, see
http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2006/04/17/004282.html

And by the way, it seems that Helium (another gas mentioned previously
on this list a while back as a possible candidate for tire inflation),
although otherwise perfectly suited to the job because of its absolutely
inert and non-reactive properties, is just so skinny an atom that it is
simply likely to leak out right past the rubber in comparatively short
order (though perhaps not on so short a time frame so as to cause a car
load of Amphi people on a hot day to all suddenly commence speaking like
Donald Duck at the Celina McDonald's drive-through window...though
that's a fine thought too, Eh?)

Bilgey


On Thu, 5 Jul 2007 8:31 am, rlgreen_55 wrote:
> There is a lot of debate as to how long a tire will last before it
> starts deteriorating and is unsafe to use. Obviously if it is exposed
> to the sun they won't last near as long. I have a set of Sears 13"
> Allstate tires appox 20 years old with less then 500 miles on them
> that I wouldn't use on a garden trailer.
>
> Most tire manufactures recommend that tires be changed regardless of
> mileage at 8 years. As we know they are in the business to sell tires
> and have a huge liability in today's world so that figure may be
> closer to 10 or 12 years?
>
> Ron Green
>
> --- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, nelson625@... wrote:
>>
>> Additional Trivia after reading Ed Price's note. Antique cars
> which get
>> generally minimal use and RV's which likewise often get minimal
> use considering
>> the time frame that the tires are on the vehicles suffer from tire
> failure
>> from reasons other than mileage.
>>
>> I own a 1931 Ford Roadster for which I bought brand new Goodyear
> (duplicate
>> of OEM's) Tires 2 years ago, and except that the car has been off
> the road for
>> 2 years now due to more urgent projects, I would have put the new
> tires on.
>> Model A Fords had a neat feature with the wheels, incidentally -
> they had
>> what were called "Drop center Rims" so that to change a tire, you
> took the
>> wheel off the vehicle, then squeezed the 2 beads together
> and "dropped" the tire
>> into the center of the rim whereby you could then remove the tire
> on the
>> opposite side of the rim from the wheel all without using any tools
> in most
>> cases. Anyway, the story I started to tell was that though I read
> all the time
>> of the degradation of tires due to oxidation, sunlight and etc, the
> tires on
>> my Roadster were put on in 1971. Until I stopped driving it 2 years
> ago with
>> the intention of having it repainted, I regularly drove it at
> highway speeds of
>> 55 mph. I finally decided this was unwise which is why I bought
> the
>> replacements. However, in that entire 34 years, the tires required
> no repairs and
>> served very well. I first saw this car in 1969 and a close
> personal friend
>> bought it and restored it in 1970-1971 which is why I know it's
> history so
>> well. It was never rusty even in the rear floor pan. I bought it
> in 1987 - hard
>> to believe that is now 20 years ago. Anyway, it makes one wonder.
>>
>> On the other side of the coin, I have thrown rubber tread from RV
> tires
>> which were in excellent condition to look at them, and were only 5
> or 6 years
>> old. Recently, on my 1948 Ford Woodie which had 5 beautiful
> looking wide white
>> wall tires, we embarked on what ended up to be a 700 mile trip in
> company
>> with 15 other antiques. I examined the tires carefully the day
> before we left.
>> Though one could detect that they were not new, they had perfect
> tread and not
>> obvious weathering (of course it is in the garage 98% of the time.)
> 60 miles
>> into the trip, during which time I had been traveling 45-55 mph, I
> began
>> throwing rubber from one tire. One cannot simply stop and buy a
> replacement at a
>> store along the way, so I considered my options. I ended up
> driving the rest
>> of the 700 miles with the matching unused spare and not exceeding
> 45 mph
>> which kept the centrifugal force lower, I reasoned. I am now in
> the process of
>> preparing to acquire new tires- probably Diamond Back Classics
> from the
>> various information e-mails I have received from Amphi and Woodie
> friends. However,
>> it is interesting to note the particulars here. I do not know the
> age of the
>> tires as they did not use standard date codes until fairly
> recently to my
>> knowledge. These tires were on the car when I acquired it 10 years
> ago and may
>> well be 10-20 years older than that. They are also, for what it is
> worth,
>> Bias Ply tires.
>>
>> So that is my 2 cents worth of interesting or odd information.
> Vic Nelson
>> near Daytona
>>
>>
>>
>> ************************************** See what's free at
> http://www.aol.com.
>>
>
>
 
N

nelson625@aol.com

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table id="role_body" style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" bottomMargin="7" leftMargin="7" topMargin="7" rightMargin="7"><font id="role_document" face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2">
On the subject of Nitrogen inflation vs ordinary "air" from our atmosphere, just tonight I read a small detail that I found of some interest and possibly ties into this discussion in some way. The current July 5th issue of Old Cars Weekly which has a picture of the Tulsarama Plymouth on the cover and more information inside mentions on the lower left part of Page 24 that "shockingly, most of the tires still held air." I don't know if this means there was still air in the tires or that they were still inflatable, but I suspect it meant 2 or 3 or 4 of them still held a reasonable amount of 1957 vintage air ! Almost certainly, the tires were tubeless, though I wouldn't know that for certain. However, in light of our nitrogen vs Oxygen in the atmosphere for tire inflation discussion, this is an interesting tidbit. I have had a fewtube type tires hold a respectable amount of air for 5-10 years, but haven't been able to try for 50 years. Vic Nelson</font>


<font style="color: black; font: normal 10pt ARIAL, SAN-SERIF;"><hr style="MARGIN-TOP: 10px">See what's free at AOL.com. </font>
 
R

Robert & Ina Cabanas

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" bgColor="#ffffff">
<font size="4">Thanks Ron & Bill for your 'consejos' along with this very interesting info from Ed. I REALLY like this suggestion about carrying a can of tire inflator instead of purchasing another spare tire. It makes so much more sense all around. The only draw back is that extra blanket of security. </font>
<font size="4"></font>
<font size="4">Yes, I think I only used a spare tire on one of my cars or trucks 2 times since I started driving at 16 years of age. (I won't tell you my age now.) If I don't have to buy a spare Ican save money, use the space in the trunk for more Amphicar junk, AND have a spare wheel just in case. I may just go that route. Thanks again for the advice. I wonder how others feel about the 'No spare tire, spare tire air' insteadidea? </font>
<font size="4">Ina in the Boro (gettin' ready for Celina)</font>

<blockquote style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<div id="ygrp-text">



<div dir="ltr" align="left">
<hr tabIndex="-1">
<font face="Tahoma" size="2">From: amphicar-lovers@<wbr>yahoogroups.<wbr>com [mailto:amphicar-<wbr>lovers@yahoogrou<wbr>ps.com] On Behalf Of Robert & Ina Cabanas
Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 9:21 PM
To: amphicar-lovers@<wbr>yahoogroups.<wbr>com
Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tire Suggestions?
</font>

<blockquote>

<font size="4">Thanks John. I guess I should have thought about that last year when I ordered the Coker tires. I thought I'd be able to use the ORIGINAL German tire for a spare. When my truck mechanic saw the ORIGINAL Amphicar tire the other day he almost had a heart attack when he heard that I wanted to use it for a spare. I will listen to his advise & get another tire. Thanks. Ina<span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#800000"></font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font></blockquote>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">Tire rubber degrades simply by contact with sunlight (UV) and air (O2 & O3).Even if you have decent tread left on an original Vredestein tire, it's still nearly 50 years old! Makes a nice conversation piece, but you should never drive on it.</font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">Spare tires may be a thing of thepast now. The last time I had to use a spare tire was (IIRC) in 1984,on a Chrysler equipped with those flawed 1975 Firestone 500 tires. Once in 23 years seems to be poor justification for hauling around a 50-pound spare tire wherever you go. Besides, the usual failure mode is a slow leak that leaves the tire flat, nottotal physical destruction of the tire. What you most often need is a little air in the tire to get you to a service location (or home). I carry an inflator can for this reason.</font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">For an Amphi, which is typically very low mileage and well maintained, and driven at low speed, I don't think you even need to carry a spare and jack. (Due to serious rust, I replaced my original jacking plates with plain steel panels, so I can't even jack my Amphi the factory way.)</font><font color="#0000ff">Carry an inflation can, but leaving the spare and jack at home will give you a bit less weight in the bow.</font></span></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007">
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">Ed Price</font>
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">El Cajon, CA USA</font>
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">67 Rust Guppy</font>
<div align="left"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span></font>


</blockquote>
 
G

glennyrosa@comcast.net

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table>
I dunno if spare tire inna can wudda helped me. I've had 2 flats in 600 miles on my new BFG's. That's like double the number of flats I've had in the last 10 years with my other cars. Nails. Big ass knarley nails. Same tire. Happened both times after visiting this one boat ramp. Hmmmmmmm. Neighbor??

glencho

<blockquote style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">-------------- Original message --------------
From: "Robert & Ina Cabanas" <ribcab@verizon.net>

<div id="ygrp-text">



<font size="4">Thanks Ron & Bill for your 'consejos' along with this very interesting info from Ed. I REALLY like this suggestion about carrying a can of tire inflator instead of purchasing another spare tire. It makes so much more sense all around. The only draw back is that extra blanket of security. </font>
<font size="4"></font>
<font size="4">Yes, I think I only used a spare tire on one of my cars or trucks 2 times since I started driving at 16 years of age. (I won't tell you my age now.) If I don't have to buy a spare Ican save money, use the space in the trunk for more Amphicar junk, AND have a spare wheel just in case. I may just go that route. Thanks again for the advice. I wonder how others feel about the 'No spare tire, spare tire air' insteadidea? </font>
<font size="4">Ina in the Boro (gettin' ready for Celina)</font>

<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid">
<div id="ygrp-text">



<div dir="ltr" align="left">
<hr tabIndex="-1">
<font face="Tahoma" size="2">From: amphicar-lovers@<wbr>yahoogroups.<wbr>com [mailto:amphicar-<wbr>lovers@yahoogrou<wbr>ps.com] On Behalf Of Robert & Ina Cabanas
Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 9:21 PM
To: amphicar-lovers@<wbr>yahoogroups.<wbr>com
Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tire Suggestions?
</font>

<blockquote>

<font size="4">Thanks John. I guess I should have thought about that last year when I ordered the Coker tires. I thought I'd be able to use the ORIGINAL German tire for a spare. When my truck mechanic saw the ORIGINAL Amphicar tire the other day he almost had a heart attack when he heard that I wanted to use it for a spare. I will listen to his advise & get another tire. Thanks. Ina<span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#800000"></font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font></blockquote>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">Tire rubber degrades simply by contact with sunlight (UV) and air (O2 & O3).Even if you have decent tread left on an original Vredestein tire, it's still nearly 50 years old! Makes a nice conversation piece, but you should never drive on it.</font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">Spare tires may be a thing of thepast now. The last time I had to use a spare tire was (IIRC) in 1984,on a Chrysler equipped with those flawed 1975 Firestone 500 tires. Once in 23 years seems to be poor justification for hauling around a 50-pound spare tire wherever you go. Besides, the usual failure mode is a slow leak that leaves the tire flat, nottotal physical destruction of the tire. What you most often need is a little air in the tire to get you to a service location (or home). I carry an inflator can for this reason.</font></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"><font color="#0000ff">For an Amphi, which is typically very low mileage and well maintained, and driven at low speed, I don't think you even need to carry a spare and jack. (Due to serious rust, I replaced my original jacking plates with plain steel panels, so I can't even jack my Amphi the factory way.)</font><font color="#0000ff">Carry an inflation can, but leaving the spare and jack at home will give you a bit less weight in the bow.</font></span></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007"></span></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"><span class="468012612-04072007">
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">Ed Price</font>
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">El Cajon, CA USA</font>
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">67 Rust Guppy</font>
<div align="left"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span></font>


</blockquote>


</blockquote>
 
G

glennyrosa@comcast.net

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table>
The aviation industry uses nitrogen in tubeless (generally all light and heavy jets) in tires to prevent corrosion associated with moisture found in shop air. These wheels are made from magnesium and aluminum which are subject to corrosion problems associated with moisture. Also it's difficult to find shop air that goes over 140 psi to service tires in the 250 psi range. Costco brags about using nitrogen. It's dry and won't rust your wheels. As far as leak rate, it's the same. It's a gas. The air we breath is 85% nitrogen. The air we put in an Amphicar goes into a tube. Our wheels are subject to a lot of water. They rust. Get over it. Nitrogen in Amphi tires is a waste of money.

glenn in oregon
<blockquote style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">-------------- Original message --------------
From: nelson625@aol.com

<div id="ygrp-text">


<font id="role_document" face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2">
On the subject of Nitrogen inflation vs ordinary "air" from our atmosphere, just tonight I read a small detail that I found of some interest and possibly ties into this discussion in some way. The current July 5th issue of Old Cars Weekly which has a picture of the Tulsarama Plymouth on the cover and more information inside mentions on the lower left part of Page 24 that "shockingly, most of the tires still held air." I don't know if this means there was still air in the tires or that they were still inflatable, but I suspect it meant 2 or 3 or 4 of them still held a reasonable amount of 1957 vintage air ! Almost certainly, the tires were tubeless, though I wouldn't know that for certain. However, in light of our nitrogen vs Oxygen in the atmosphere for tire inflation discussion, this is an interesting tidbit. I have had a fewtube type tires hold a respectable amount of air for 5-10 years, but haven't been able to try for 50 years. Vic
Nelson</font>



<font style="FONT: 10pt ARIAL, SAN-SERIF; COLOR: black">
<hr>
See what's free at AOL.com. </font>


</blockquote>
 
R

rlgreen_55

Guest
California car cover company( http://www.calcarcover.com/product.aspx?
s=on&id=59 ) offers a cheap tire cover for your RV or trailer. I have
noticed that since using these the past 5 years my trailer tires seem
to last much longer. Stating this I've probably now doomed myself to
a summer full of tire issues. You also can usually buy them at your
local RV dealer and save on shipping.

Ina, I don't carry a spare in Amphi however I do carry one in the
trailer / truck just in case. This frees up a lot of space in amphi's
trunk for important stuff like beer, inflatable's, scientific
experiments, family portraits, etc.

Ron Green


--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "Robert & Ina Cabanas"
<ribcab@...> wrote:
>
> Thanks Ron & Bill for your 'consejos' along with this very
interesting info from Ed. I REALLY like this suggestion about
carrying a can of tire inflator instead of purchasing another spare
tire. It makes so much more sense all around. The only draw back is
that extra blanket of security.
>
> Yes, I think I only used a spare tire on one of my cars or trucks 2
times since I started driving at 16 years of age. (I won't tell you
my age now.) If I don't have to buy a spare I can save money, use
the space in the trunk for more Amphicar junk, AND have a spare wheel
just in case. I may just go that route. Thanks again for the
advice. I wonder how others feel about the 'No spare tire, spare
tire air' instead idea?
> Ina in the Boro (gettin' ready for Celina)
>
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
----------
> From: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amphicar-
lovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert & Ina Cabanas
> Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 9:21 PM
> To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tire Suggestions?
>
>
> Thanks John. I guess I should have thought about that last
year when I ordered the Coker tires. I thought I'd be able to use
the ORIGINAL German tire for a spare. When my truck mechanic saw the
ORIGINAL Amphicar tire the other day he almost had a heart attack
when he heard that I wanted to use it for a spare. I will listen to
his advise & get another tire. Thanks. Ina
>
> Tire rubber degrades simply by contact with sunlight (UV) and air
(O2 & O3). Even if you have decent tread left on an original
Vredestein tire, it's still nearly 50 years old! Makes a nice
conversation piece, but you should never drive on it.
>
> Spare tires may be a thing of the past now. The last time I had
to use a spare tire was (IIRC) in 1984, on a Chrysler equipped with
those flawed 1975 Firestone 500 tires. Once in 23 years seems to be
poor justification for hauling around a 50-pound spare tire wherever
you go. Besides, the usual failure mode is a slow leak that leaves
the tire flat, not total physical destruction of the tire. What you
most often need is a little air in the tire to get you to a service
location (or home). I carry an inflator can for this reason.
>
> For an Amphi, which is typically very low mileage and well
maintained, and driven at low speed, I don't think you even need to
carry a spare and jack. (Due to serious rust, I replaced my original
jacking plates with plain steel panels, so I can't even jack my Amphi
the factory way.) Carry an inflation can, but leaving the spare and
jack at home will give you a bit less weight in the bow.
>
> Ed Price
> El Cajon, CA USA
> 67 Rust Guppy
>
 
M

Mike Israel

Guest
Re: Re: Tire Suggestions?

<table><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">Ina,
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">I also took out the spare and simply carry a can of fix-a-flat. If you are running radial tires you should have tubes in them. I suspect the tube inside a radial also provides another layer of protection against flats.
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">Happy sailing.
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">Mike
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">
 
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