Tachometer

C

capon23@aol.com

Guest
<table id="role_body" style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" bottomMargin="7" leftMargin="7" topMargin="7" rightMargin="7"><font id="role_document" face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2">
Mike,

I have one in my car which is a very late 67. It appears to have come that way from the Factory. It matches everything perfectly, But I think it was dealer installed. John Bevins would know for sure, so Johnny B. Help us on this one!

Cigarman</font>


<font style="color: black; font: normal 10pt ARIAL, SAN-SERIF;"><hr style="MARGIN-TOP: 10px">See what's new at AOL.com and Make AOL Your Homepage.</font>
 
M

Mike Israel

Guest
Hi All,

I recall seeing that someone at Celina had fitted a tachometer into the space
where the clock normally sits. Whatever they used, it was a fairly good match
in terms of appearance to the other gauges. I assume it came from another
vehicle.

Any suggestions on what tachs might fit in that slot? Seems like a much more
useful gauge than the clock.

Thanks,

Mike
 
A

a_colo_native

Guest
> I recall seeing that someone at Celina had fitted a tachometer into
the space where the clock normally sits. Whatever they used, it was a
fairly good match in terms of appearance to the other gauges. I
assume it came from another vehicle.
>
> Any suggestions on what tachs might fit in that slot? Seems like a
much more useful gauge than the clock.

Mike -

Sometimes the dealer would instal a tach in place of the clock. They
would move the clock into the glovebox door. Seek out a vintage
Airguide tach for the perfect match. For marine use, a clock is
essential for navigation. If you know your speed, you can calculate
your distance with the clock.

John "Tach-y" Bevins
 
E

Eric M

Guest
Re: Re: Tachometer

I was looking at the below John and I'm trying to figure how in the 60's you "knew" your speed on water? Today I just look at my GPS but how did they do it in olden times? Really missed you in Lake Ozark. Was cataloging my pictures from all of them and there were plenty of you and Darryl. Eric

a_colo_native <rma@amphicar.com> wrote: <blockquote class="replbq" style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">Sometimes the dealer would instal a tach in place of the clock. They
would move the clock into the glovebox door. Seek out a vintage
Airguide tach for the perfect match. For marine use, <u>a clock is
essential for navigation. If you know your speed, you can calculate
your distance with the clock.
</u>

John "Tach-y" Bevins

</blockquote>
 
A

a_colo_native

Guest
Eric - In an Amphi it's no more than 6 Knots, even an estimation
would be pretty close. Most boats did have speedos even earlier
ones. I usually figure it at between "putt putt"
and "weee!!!!" ;) ;)

John


--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, Eric M <e_mattlin@...> wrote:
>
> I was looking at the below John and I'm trying to figure how in
the 60's you "knew" your speed on water? Today I just look at my
GPS but how did they do it in olden times?
>
> Really missed you in Lake Ozark. Was cataloging my pictures
from all of them and there were plenty of you and Darryl.
>
> Eric
>
> a_colo_native <rma@...> wrote:
> Sometimes the dealer would instal a tach in place of the clock.
They
> would move the clock into the glovebox door. Seek out a vintage
> Airguide tach for the perfect match. For marine use, a clock is
> essential for navigation. If you know your speed, you can
calculate
> your distance with the clock.
>
> John "Tach-y" Bevins
>
 
W

WB6WSN

Guest
RE: Re: Tachometer

<table>
<font color="#800000" size="4"></font>

<blockquote style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<div class="OutlookMessageHeader" lang="en-us" dir="ltr" align="left">
<hr tabIndex="-1">
<font face="Tahoma" size="2">From: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric M
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2007 11:24 AM
To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tachometer
</font>


I was looking at the below John and I'm trying to figure how in the 60's you "knew" your speed on water? Today I just look at my GPS but how did they do it in olden times?

<font color="#800000" size="4"></font>
Eric
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#800000" size="4"></font></span></blockquote>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4">In the really olden times, you threw a small log off the bow, then timed how long it took to sail past it, and calculated your speed (knowing the length of your vessel). A variation is to toss a small sea anchor and lineoff the stern, and count the knots in the line for a time period. (Don't remember the formula for that.)</font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4">In the middle olden times, you dumped a propeller-like device over the stern, and it rotated proportionally to vessel speed. RPM could be related to vessel speed.</font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4">In therecent olden times, when yachts had tachometers, you could run a measured course (like one buoy to another, or maybe a breakwater had a paint-stripe every quarter mile). Typically, you would calibrate several RPM settings for MPH.</font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4">Before GPS, you could use a vehicle radar to measure your speed relative to a shore object. Or have a friend on shore measure you in your boat.</font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff"><font size="4">This advice is moot for an Amphi, since they didn't come with tachometers.Further, it doesn't really matter much whether you are doing 4.5 MPH or 6 MPH. Unless you are up to something truly unique, Amphis don't really call for much in the way ofnavigating skills. <g></font></font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4">I imagine that you could relate the height of the standing wave of your wake water to Amphi speed. OTOH, it might be a bit difficult to reach back and measure that.</font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span>
<span class="109290423-10102007">
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">Ed Price</font>
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">El Cajon, CA USA</font>
<div align="left"><font face="Century Schoolbook" color="#0000ff" size="4">67 Rust Guppy</font>
<div align="left"><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font><font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font></span>
 
B

Bill Connelly

Guest
Re: Re: Tachometer

I guess in the 60s one took a hit of mescaline and then if a fish
wearing a toupee came up to the surface and told you to slow down
through the school zone, you knew you were going too fast, Casey Jones.

Just a guess.

Bilgey

On Wed, 10 Oct 2007 7:46 pm, WB6WSN wrote:
>> --------------------
>>
>> From: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
>> [mailto:amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric M
>> Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2007 11:24 AM
>> To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
>> Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tachometer
>>
>> I was looking at the below John and I'm trying to figure how in the
>> 60's you "knew" your speed on water?? Today I just look at my GPS but
>> how did they do it in olden times?
>>
>> Eric
>
> In the really olden times, you threw a small log off the bow, then
> timed how long it took to sail past it, and calculated your speed
> (knowing the length of your vessel). A variation is to toss a small sea
> anchor and line?off the stern, and count the knots in the line for a
> time period. (Don't remember the formula for that.)
>
> In the middle olden times, you dumped a propeller-like device over the
> stern, and it rotated proportionally to vessel speed. RPM could be
> related to vessel speed.
>
> In the?recent olden times, when yachts had tachometers, you could run a
> measured course (like one buoy to another, or maybe a breakwater had a
> paint-stripe every quarter mile). Typically, you would calibrate
> several RPM settings for MPH.
>
> Before GPS, you could use a vehicle radar to measure your speed
> relative to a shore object. Or have a friend on shore measure you in
> your boat.
>
> This advice is moot for an Amphi, since they didn't come with
> tachometers. Further, it doesn't really matter much whether you are
> doing 4.5 MPH or 6 MPH. Unless you are up to something truly unique,
> Amphis don't really call for much in the way of?navigating skills. <g>
>
> I imagine that you could relate the height of the standing wave of your
> wake water to Amphi speed. OTOH, it might be a bit difficult to reach
> back and measure that.
>
> Ed Price
>
> El Cajon, CA? USA
>
> 67 Rust Guppy
>
>
 
J

John Friese

Guest
Mike,

One of my cars came with a dead tach where the clock should be and an
aftermarket clock stuck through the glove box door. What a hack job
considering it was, I guess, a dealer mod. Anyway, when I restored
the car I replaced the glove door and found an original clock (which I
had converted to quartz) and put it in the right place again. Since I
wanted a tach too I found a small tach sold at Kragen auto parts for
about $35 which I mounted to the steering column on the right side.
It works well, isn't too obvious and doesn't take up any leg room.
I'm not sure if it will work on a positive ground car though but I
switched both my cars to negative ground when I restored them.

I still have that dead tach and its paperwork. It is a Veglia tach
that would work on both positive and negative ground systems.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red

--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, Bill Connelly <amphicar@...>
wrote:
>
> I guess in the 60s one took a hit of mescaline and then if a fish
> wearing a toupee came up to the surface and told you to slow down
> through the school zone, you knew you were going too fast, Casey Jones.
>
> Just a guess.
>
> Bilgey
>
> On Wed, 10 Oct 2007 7:46 pm, WB6WSN wrote:
> >> --------------------
> >>
> >> From: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
> >> [mailto:amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric M
> >> Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2007 11:24 AM
> >> To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
> >> Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] Re: Tachometer
> >>
> >> I was looking at the below John and I'm trying to figure how in the
> >> 60's you "knew" your speed on water? Today I just look at my GPS
but
> >> how did they do it in olden times?
> >>
> >> Eric
> >
> > In the really olden times, you threw a small log off the bow, then
> > timed how long it took to sail past it, and calculated your speed
> > (knowing the length of your vessel). A variation is to toss a
small sea
> > anchor and line off the stern, and count the knots in the line for a
> > time period. (Don't remember the formula for that.)
> >
> > In the middle olden times, you dumped a propeller-like device over
the
> > stern, and it rotated proportionally to vessel speed. RPM could be
> > related to vessel speed.
> >
> > In the recent olden times, when yachts had tachometers, you could
run a
> > measured course (like one buoy to another, or maybe a breakwater
had a
> > paint-stripe every quarter mile). Typically, you would calibrate
> > several RPM settings for MPH.
> >
> > Before GPS, you could use a vehicle radar to measure your speed
> > relative to a shore object. Or have a friend on shore measure you in
> > your boat.
> >
> > This advice is moot for an Amphi, since they didn't come with
> > tachometers. Further, it doesn't really matter much whether you are
> > doing 4.5 MPH or 6 MPH. Unless you are up to something truly unique,
> > Amphis don't really call for much in the way of navigating skills. <g>
> >
> > I imagine that you could relate the height of the standing wave of
your
> > wake water to Amphi speed. OTOH, it might be a bit difficult to reach
> > back and measure that.
> >
> > Ed Price
> >
> > El Cajon, CA USA
> >
> > 67 Rust Guppy
> >
> >
>
 
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