sunk duck

Discussion in 'General Amphicar Discussion' started by Steve Behnke, Sep 29, 2000.

  1. Steve Behnke
    Offline

    Steve Behnke Guest

    For anyone who was interested in the cause of the Milwaukee sinking ...
    the local news had another story a few days back.

    They said a 'propeller' broke and cut through it's housing which allowed water
    to enter the hull.

    The parts they showed on the news appeared to be an impeller inside a cast metal
    tube.
    The cast tube had a groove/hole worn through it 4-5 inches long and an inch to
    an inch and a half
    wide.

    Below are two of the original reports.


    MILWAUKEE, September 19 * Seventeen tourists and two crew members are safe after
    the amphibious vehicle they were riding in sank in Lake Michigan. LIEUTENANT
    COMMANDER Bryan Emond says the crew noticed water coming into the vessel, known
    by many as a Duck, about twelve-thirty Monday afternoon. It was about 200 yards
    from the Bay View coast guard station at the time. The six-wheel vessel built in
    1967 is owned by Minnow Tour in St. Francis. It was inspected in May. A police
    and coast guard boat assisted the passengers. Emond says all passengers remained
    calm and no one got wet. Emond says they are unsure why the vessel sank. He also
    says this vehicle is different from the "Ducks" in the Wisconsin Dells. Those
    were built by General Motors. This vessel was built as an amphibious assault
    vehicle.


    Coast Guard Rescues Sinking 'Duck'
    17 Passengers, 2 Crew Members Saved Monday
    MILWAUKEE, Updated 12:43 a.m. EDT September 19, 2000 -- Seventeen passengers and
    two crew members were rescued when a military-style amphibious vehicle sank in
    Milwaukee's Lake Michigan harbor Monday.
    Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Bryan Emond said the crew noticed water was coming into
    the vessel, known as a "duck," around 12:30 p.m. after an alarm went off
    indicating a high water level in the bilge.
    The six-wheeled vessel was about 200 yards from the Coast Guard station at the
    time.
    Police and Coast Guard boats assisted the passengers.
    Emond said all the passengers remained calm and no one got wet.
    The vessel, a British Stalwart built in 1967, is owned by Minnow Tour in
    suburban St. Francis and passed an inspection in May, Emond said.
    It is 20.8 feet long, a little over 8 feet wide, and can carry 28 people, he
    said. It sank in about 26 feet of water.
    Emond said the vehicle was built as an amphibious assault vehicle but is
    different than the World War II vintage "ducks," produced by General Motors,
    that are a popular tourist attraction on the Wisconsin River at Wisconsin Dells.
    The cause of Monday's sinking remained under investigation.
    In an Arkansas accident on May 1, 1999, 13 of 21 passengers drowned when an
    amphibious boat of World War II vintage sank while carrying tourists on Lake
    Hamilton. The Coast Guard concluded that a dislodged drive-shaft seal allowed
    water to flood the hull, and the bilge pump failed to work.
     
  2. David Chapman
    Offline

    Hmm..

    Thanks for the update Steve, that would explain it, the Stalwart has metal
    props running in tubes, they look like water jets but are not. The props are
    in metal tubes to protect them from hitting things and catching ropes, and
    there is a mesh on the front of the tube to stop things getting sucked in.

    This is fine but does mean if the bearing fails big-time on the prop the
    torque of the engine (it's a monster 4 litre Rolls Royce Petrol) could cause
    the prop to gouge a hole in the hull, I guess that's what happened.

    Amphicar had a different approach, the propellers are strong nylon but will
    break before causing any damage to surrounding metalwork, and that's also
    why you must not use anything except the cone shape plastic nut to hold them
    on. Then if you get the prop caught in a mooring rope it will strip the
    threads off the nut and the prop will come off - bad news but at least no
    holes !

    And remember, if ever you find yourself in a 1 prop Amphicar, forwards =
    circles but you can go backwards in a reasonably straight line !


    David Chapman


    > For anyone who was interested in the cause of the Milwaukee sinking ...
    > the local news had another story a few days back.
    >
    > They said a 'propeller' broke and cut through it's housing which allowed
    water to enter the hull.
    >
    > The parts they showed on the news appeared to be an impeller inside a cast
    metal tube.
    > The cast tube had a groove/hole worn through it 4-5 inches long and an
    inch to an inch and a half
    > wide.
    >
     
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