Soda blasting...

C

Craig

Guest
My car will be getting the soda blast treatment soon. I'm going to get
it back in a primer coat and address the fender rust and any other
issues I may find myself. My body man was asking if I would want to
inspect the body seams before they put in it primer. Is there a
factory sealer in the seams? Like a calking or something? I think I
read that the cars were lead seamed from the factory. I'm just
wondering if the soda blast might remove something from the seams that
should be reapplied prior to the primer.

Thanks...
Craig in Alaska
Red 66
 
M

Mike Israel

Guest
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Soda blasting will not remove rust. It is generally only used on vehicles which have very solid bodies but you want to get rid of the paint. It is very effective in that you do not even need to remove the windshield. Usually on something like an Amphi, media blasting is the way to go. It will remove the rust but does not have the heat and pitting issues associated with sand (sand is almost always a bad idea on sheetmetal).

Mixed opinions on lead filler. The instructors at McPherson's restoration program will tell you to get rid of it entirely and use modern sealers. Other purists will tell you that since lead is what they used at the factory then it is also what you should use today. Lead is certainly more toxic, more difficult to work with, and will cause you problems if not 100% prepped properly. You will have to do some work, do not expect that the original seam sealer will all be in good condition.



----- Original Message ----
From: Craig <taylorcm@alyeska-pipeline.com>
To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2006 4:44:26 PM
Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Soda blasting...

My car will be getting the soda blast treatment soon. I'm going to get
it back in a primer coat and address the fender rust and any other
issues I may find myself. My body man was asking if I would want to
inspect the body seams before they put in it primer. Is there a
factory sealer in the seams? Like a calking or something? I think I
read that the cars were lead seamed from the factory. I'm just
wondering if the soda blast might remove something from the seams that
should be reapplied prior to the primer.

Thanks...
Craig in Alaska
Red 66
 
D

David Chapman

Guest
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> Mixed opinions on lead filler. The instructors at McPherson's restoration program will tell you to get rid of it entirely and use modern sealers. Other purists will tell you that
> since lead is what they used at the factory then it is also what you should use today. Lead is certainly more toxic, more difficult to work with, and will cause you problems if not > 100% prepped properly.
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<font face="Arial" size="2">Hi Mike, I think you are being a bit unfair on Lead. One problem with the plastic fillers is they have a finite life - understandable as most modern cars will be expected to be recycled in 10 years or so - and plastic fillers do go brittle over time (15 years plus) but their biggest problem on our cars is plastic fillers absorb water. Easier to use ? Up to a point - certainly for the unskilled as it gives you time to spread - but you still have to mix it. Once you have learnt how to use lead (which takes a few days) then it is actually quicker than plastic fillers, no mixing time, and the amount of prep is the same if you are using plastic or lead. Lead is a challenge because you only havea window of a few degrees when it is workable - but if you rotate the car so you work area is flat than it's not a problem if it gets too hot as it just pools and then you let it cool slightly and continue.</font>
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<font face="Arial" size="2">Lead really wins in two areas: It lasts forever and it bends with the metal - both important points onan Amphicar. I wouldn't expect my everyday cars to be repaired with lead but it is still used at the top end of the market on cars like Aston Martin and Morgan. I know people that work at Morgan - the factory is a couple of miles from here. We all know the cars look old but they do use new technology where it does a better job - such as engines which are now mostly BMW V8 - but when it comes to building the bodies they still use lead as it is "the best material for the job" </font>
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<font face="Arial" size="2">Finally the eco and safety stuff. Two rules really, never use power tools (the dust is not good) and wash hands before eating - but then that fine dust from plastic fillers is unlikely to be beneficial for health. </font>
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<font face="Arial" size="2">David C</font>
 
M

Mike Israel

Guest
<table><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">Dave,
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<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">The guys at McPhearson are doing rare, Pepple Beach quality cars, not throw aways. The issue they raise with lead is the acid within and that it is the first area where paint is eventually going to lift. Indeed, even on many of the old cars you find in barns with original paint, the area where the paint will most likely be gone is wherever there was a lead seam.
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">
<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">If someone wants to use lead, go right ahead. Yes, it will likely last a long time. I still think that your modern fillers are just as good or better with a lot less hassle. I do not think water absorption is an issue. For the most part, cars built in the last 15 years no longer rust (foe many reasons). You can not say that about any vehicle built pre-1980's. especially those European, lead filled models! :)
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<div style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif">Mike
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A

antique459@aol.com

Guest
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I just read an article in cars and parts that used a lead free solder. I goes on the same way but is not toxic like lead is. Thekit is complete with everything you need and is available from, who else but the Eastwood Company.</font>
 
R

rlgreen_55

Guest
--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, antique459@... wrote:
>
> I just read an article in cars and parts that used a lead free
solder. I
> goes on the same way but is not toxic like lead is. The kit is
complete with
> everything you need and is available from, who else but the Eastwood
Company.

I too read the Old Car's Weekly article on the use of lead free solder
and it sounded like a good solution, plus its heat range when applying
is much better by a few hundred degrees then lead.

Soda blasting may not be aggressive enough unless you just want to take
a layer of paint off. If the intent is to go to bare metal a light
glass bead might be better but definiteity not sand.

Ron Green
Camp Hill, PA.
 
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