Side Molding Installation

Tedredamphi

Platinum Subscriber
Any helpful hints for installing the new rubber inserts on the body side molding? Do you slide the rubber in from the ends or ??? How about where the moulding meets the pointed aluminum tips - does it just but against the tip or do you need to trim and tuck the rubber under the tip?
Thanks,
Ted
 

CapnJohn

Amphi Guru & Former IAOC President
You won't be able to slide them in. Cut them about an inch or so long to slow the shrinking process and keep them looking good for a while. I have a stubby wide blade screwdriver that I rounded off the edges. Place the lower lip into the molding to hold it in place. Use the screwdriver to tuck the upper lip into the molding being careful not to gauge the insert or alum. Once you get it started, use your finger to pull down slightly while pushing the lip into the molding. Tough to describe, but with practice you should work out the technique. I can get the entire side (3 pieces) on in about 30 mins or less.

The under layment should have but a single seam at the bottom about 3" or so from the end if done correctly. Cut it about 6"-8" long (make sure you have enough extra length to do all 4.) Cut it so you have a "tail" on one side leaving a 1/4" or so lip to go under the molding. You will end up having the tail follow around the end of the molding, wrapping around the tip and then meeting at the bottom. You may need to make a couple pie cuts to allow it to bend tightly at the tip. If you still have an original piece, look to see how the factory prepped the piece to fit. If you have a butt joint at the tip, it will seperate and look horrible.

Tough to describe and a process I once had on the IAOC site clearly pictured, I don't see any of it there now.
 

fouramphs

Member
The reproduction white trim.
I start with the front, then rear and last the doors.
rough cut to length and add a few inches
taper the starting end to slide better.
Soak the trim in warm soap water then as you start it pour dish soap on the trim
I install a long screw into the end of trim.With 2 people have one clamp on screw with vice grips and other guide trim into channel.
It, will now slide in very easily..When you get to end pull trim ou off channel a bit and pull past end.Push trim in tight with towel to remove strech,leave a overhang on this end too.If you can leave for a day before final trim, cut back the pointy end and fit into cup. leave other end a bit long and do not put alu, ends on till car is 99% done,, to fit alu, ends pull out of track, fit ends then use Johns method for final reasembly/
Gord S/>>>
 

Tedredamphi

Platinum Subscriber
So how is the side molding insert supposed to fit into the pointed cup???:005:
Ted
 

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CapnJohn

Amphi Guru & Former IAOC President
So how is the side molding insert supposed to fit into the pointed cup???:005:
Ted

Hugh's molding isn't an exact match to correct original pieces, so you will have that extra lip. It is suppose to fit as a butt joint to the alum end rather than inside it as I think you are saying. I have used an air sander to round off the ends to minimize that but you have it as good as Hugh's moldings get.

Nice job of the end wrap! You may consider adding a small dollop of epoxy under and in the ends to help secure them in place.
 

Tedredamphi

Platinum Subscriber
Thanks for the help and affirmation John. I sort of figured that the insert from Gordon Imports was a "a little too fat". I don't know about epoxy, but super glue does a good job of butting rubber ends together like the side molding underlayment.
Thanks,
Ted
 

CapnJohn

Amphi Guru & Former IAOC President
You're very welcome!

The one problem with superglue is that it is very brittle. It's bet used for things that don't move, bend or expand. Epoxy is a little more "plastic" when cured which allows it to bend and move more freely without breaking like superglue will. I rough up the pieces before glueing so they have some "gription" to work with
 

jfriese

Active Member
There are rubberized versions of super glue available. Some talk about it and some don't. It's never the super thin versions though. "Gorilla" brand is one that I find most places and it is rubberized so that it doesn't crack easily.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red
 
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