Powder Coating

A

amphi67

Guest
Does anybody have any first-hand experience with powder
coating? I keep having the continuous problem with wheel
cylinders leaking and each time it happens, the brake
fluid keeps ruining the paint on my wheels. I don't see
a permanent fix to the wheel cylinder problem because
you never know when it's gonna happen. So, I was considering
having my wheels powder coated but I was wondering if anyone
knows if brake fluid can penetrate through the powder coating
before I look into having this done. Thanks in advance.

Rick Young
white '67 - Tennessee
 
J

John Friese

Guest
Rick,

I had the wheels on both my Amphicars powder coated. So far, at
least, brake fluid leakage hasn't damaged the finish on the wheels.
The reason that I originally powder coated the wheels was that water
can sometimes get inside the tires on these cars and rust the rims.
Powder coating is the toughest finish that I know and is most likely
to resist any rust. I think it is also immune to brake fluid. It
cost me about $200 to have all 5 rims prepared and coated. Powder
coat is available in any color and shade that you want.

It's going to be in the 90's out here today and Allan Woodcock and I
are taking our cars to Lake Casitas today. It should be a great day.

John Friese

67 White
67 Red



--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "amphi67" <Amphi67@a...> wrote:
>
> Does anybody have any first-hand experience with powder
> coating? I keep having the continuous problem with wheel
> cylinders leaking and each time it happens, the brake
> fluid keeps ruining the paint on my wheels. I don't see
> a permanent fix to the wheel cylinder problem because
> you never know when it's gonna happen. So, I was considering
> having my wheels powder coated but I was wondering if anyone
> knows if brake fluid can penetrate through the powder coating
> before I look into having this done. Thanks in advance.
>
> Rick Young
> white '67 - Tennessee
 
M

Michael Echemann

Guest
Rick:
I'm had several sets of wheels powder coated and I really like the results.
I'll never switch back. I haven't had brake fluid leakage issues but I
suspect this wouldn't be a problem. The finish is much stronger than paint.
I've noticed that water/oil/grease drips/spots etc. are a bit harder to
clean off than with painted wheels especially if you let them sit there
awhile. It seems as if they want to leave a stain impression but with a bit
of effort it does come clean again.
Mike

----- Original Message -----
From: "amphi67" <Amphi67@aol.com>
To: <amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2003 9:57 AM
Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Powder Coating



Does anybody have any first-hand experience with powder
coating? I keep having the continuous problem with wheel
cylinders leaking and each time it happens, the brake
fluid keeps ruining the paint on my wheels. I don't see
a permanent fix to the wheel cylinder problem because
you never know when it's gonna happen. So, I was considering
having my wheels powder coated but I was wondering if anyone
knows if brake fluid can penetrate through the powder coating
before I look into having this done. Thanks in advance.

Rick Young
white '67 - Tennessee




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V

vaircrazy

Guest
Rick,
I know people will probably fry me for this one but, switch to
silicone brake fluid. It does not attack paint and is about three
times the price of regular fluid. You have to empty the complete
system and rebuild the wheel cylinders with silicone fluid. The
silicone fluid will not collect moisture like standard fluid. I have
a corvair and Amphi with this fluid and have not had a problem yet.
The Corvair sets all year in storage until I get ready to drive, it
works great. Everyone says it eats certain rubbers, not yet it has
been four years on the corvair. One year on the Amphi and still going
strong.
Mike Bayman
67 Amphicar


--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "amphi67" <Amphi67@a...>
wrote:
>
> Does anybody have any first-hand experience with powder
> coating? I keep having the continuous problem with wheel
> cylinders leaking and each time it happens, the brake
> fluid keeps ruining the paint on my wheels. I don't see
> a permanent fix to the wheel cylinder problem because
> you never know when it's gonna happen. So, I was considering
> having my wheels powder coated but I was wondering if anyone
> knows if brake fluid can penetrate through the powder coating
> before I look into having this done. Thanks in advance.
>
> Rick Young
> white '67 - Tennessee
 
R

rogtwo@aol.com

Guest
In addition to powder coating, you might want to look at two-part
polyurethane paints.

These paints are very resistant to chemicals, abrasion, and UV radiation.
They are commonly used on boats, airplanes, and for industrial coatings.
"Awlgrip" is a common brand used in boat applications, but you can find many
others
on the web.

I have not used this kind of paint on my car, but I did use it on a boat I
had. You can safely apply it yourself with a brush, and doing so gives a smooth
high-gloss finish that looks as good as most spray on jobs (but not as good
as the very best spray jobs). Do NOT try and spray this stuff yourself.
Special safety equipment is required to spray it. The spray mist is very nasty
--
it can kill you!

I don't know if two-part pulyurethanes are any better than powder coating,
but I just wanted to mention another option.

Roger St. John
White '63
Seattle



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
 
T

tommyintpa@aol.com

Guest
<table id="role_body" style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" bottomMargin="7" leftMargin="7" topMargin="7" rightMargin="7"><font id="role_document" face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2">

<font style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2">My advice would be to use a quality paint over a properly prepped
surface. That will eliminate interference and cracking problems and
reproduce the correct finish. Quality paint will provide many years of
trouble free service to any car that has even minimal care as well as
being more cost effective.



John Bevins
Rocky Mountain Amphicar
</font>


Yep Hugh,
Bones is correct on every point. Proper preparation prior to the primer going on is the most important. Onay on the powder coat. Tommy in Tampa</font>
 
A

a_colo_native

Guest
Hugh,

I spoke with a local world known Bugatti restorer (he currently has
2 of Leno's cars) about this. We agreed that powder coating has it's
place. In the case of the shrouds and seat tracks, I would advise
against it. The shrouds do not rust fast enough to warrant it or the
expense of stainless. The flexing of them also will not work well with
powder coatings. Powder coats are not flexible and thus, any flexing
due to vibrations or during installation and removal will certainly
crack the coating creating a place for corrosion and constant
chipping.

The thickness of the powder coats will also create fitment problems
with the seat tracks as it did with the engine mount plates. When
installed it hit the top edge of the crankshaft causing the motor to
appear frozen up. Once I removed the coverplate once again and removed
the coating, it was fine. The powder coating also was in the threads
and holes which needed to be re-tapped and removed from the holes to
install the bolts. Paint would not have created this problem.

My advice would be to use a quality paint over a properly prepped
surface. That will eliminate interferance and cracking problems and
reproduce the correct finish. Quality paint will provide many years of
trouble free service to any car that has even minimal care as well as
being more cost effective.



John Bevins
Rocky Mountain Amphicar
 
G

gtpeterp

Guest
I was reading up on the car that sold recently at Barret Jackson, and
apparently the "wet" portions of the car were powder coated. This
seems interesting, as I suspect it is almost a given that the hull is
going to get scraped on something even with careful use, and it seems
like powder coating would be much harder to repair than simple
undercoat paint.

Does anyone have experience with this? It seems like a good solution
from an anti-rust perspective, but I'm hesitant without hearing
someones experience.

Peter
 
G

gtpeterp

Guest
I was reading up on the car that sold recently at Barret Jackson, and
apparently the "wet" portions of the car were powder coated. This
seems interesting, as I suspect it is almost a given that the hull is
going to get scraped on something even with careful use, and it seems
like powder coating would be much harder to repair than simple
undercoat paint.

Does anyone have experience with this? It seems like a good solution
from an anti-rust perspective, but I'm hesitant without hearing
someones experience.

Peter
 
L

lah20car@aol.com

Guest
<font FACE="arial,helvetica"><font SIZE="2" PTSIZE="10" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 3/14/2007 12:02:20 AM Central Daylight Time, peter.pociask@gmail.com writes:



<blockquote TYPE="CITE" style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">but I'm hesitant without hearing

someones experience.

</blockquote>



I had my wheels powder coated three years ago and just noticed a few areas of rust on two, I had quit using it mostly because of the cost but also the finish isn't as tough as you would think.



A good epoxy primer and topcoat, two to three coats of each should be fine.





Whatever the Germans used in 63 is some good stuff, especially that yellow primer, anyone know what it is???



My too sence</font>


**************************************
AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at http://www.aol.com.
 
L

lah20car@aol.com

Guest
<font FACE="arial,helvetica"><font SIZE="2" PTSIZE="10" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 3/14/2007 12:02:20 AM Central Daylight Time, peter.pociask@gmail.com writes:



<blockquote TYPE="CITE" style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">but I'm hesitant without hearing

someones experience.

</blockquote>



I had my wheels powder coated three years ago and just noticed a few areas of rust on two, I had quit using it mostly because of the cost but also the finish isn't as tough as you would think.



A good epoxy primer and topcoat, two to three coats of each should be fine.





Whatever the Germans used in 63 is some good stuff, especially that yellow primer, anyone know what it is???



My too sence</font>


**************************************
AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at http://www.aol.com.
 
M

mstrug@juno.com

Guest
If is yellow primer, it could be Zinc-chromate. We use in on aircraft and such it comes yellow to olive drab-ish colors.Should be able to get it at paint stores. Amphigr66n.
 
M

mstrug@juno.com

Guest
If is yellow primer, it could be Zinc-chromate. We use in on aircraft and such it comes yellow to olive drab-ish colors.Should be able to get it at paint stores. Amphigr66n.
 
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