Partical Magnet

B

Brian Crombie

Guest
Greetings all,
A while back, I had my Bombardier trail groomer worked on. The mechanic that
replaced my steering bands suggested that I place a magnet in the gear oil to
pick up any particles that may have been left behind. I happened to have some
rare earth magnets so I put one in an area far away from any moving parts.
These magnets measure 1" x 3/4" and was no thicker than say three nickels
stacked on top of each other. They are also about ten times stronger than the
average magnet so I'm not worried about it moving.

Last week, I ground the splines off of one driveshaft at the tranny due to no
axle springs. For some reason, the springs were not put back on both sides
after someone worked on it. This is on the Amphi that I just bought. I was able
to reach in the tunnel and with my finger remove most of the spline chunks. I
do intend on flushing it and wonder if a rare earth magnet would be advisable.
I believe magnets, even rare earth won't stick to cast iron but it would stick
to the cover plate on the passenger side. As long as it does not interfere with
any moving parts, it should work fine. Was wondering if anyone else has done
this in the past.

Thanks in advance for your input.

Brian Crombie
Faribault, Mn.


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J

John Friese

Guest
Brian,
I've not done this with the tranny but I've done it with the engine. A
magnet on the drain plug will do a pretty good job of picking up
little bits of metal. I suspect that such a magnet somehwere in the
transmission would be even more helpful (especially in your case)
since the oil has no filter system and tends to be left in for a
longer period of time.

John Friese




--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, Brian Crombie <baddogg@d...>
wrote:
> Greetings all,
> A while back, I had my Bombardier trail groomer worked on. The
mechanic that replaced my steering bands suggested that I place a
magnet in the gear oil to pick up any particles that may have been
left behind. I happened to have some rare earth magnets so I put one
in an area far away from any moving parts. These magnets measure 1" x
3/4" and was no thicker than say three nickels stacked on top of each
other. They are also about ten times stronger than the average magnet
so I'm not worried about it moving.
>
> Last week, I ground the splines off of one driveshaft at the tranny
due to no axle springs. For some reason, the springs were not put
back on both sides after someone worked on it. This is on the Amphi
that I just bought. I was able to reach in the tunnel and with my
finger remove most of the spline chunks. I do intend on flushing it
and wonder if a rare earth magnet would be advisable. I believe
magnets, even rare earth won't stick to cast iron but it would stick
to the cover plate on the passenger side. As long as it does not
interfere with any moving parts, it should work fine. Was wondering
if anyone else has done this in the past.
>
> Thanks in advance for your input.
>
> Brian Crombie
> Faribault, Mn.
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
 
N

nelson625@aol.com

Guest
Brian -
Out of curiosity: Your remark that the rare earth magnets would not
stick to cast iron. This is news to me, and I presume from your statement that
that is the case. What do they stick to? Just to themselves? I thought all
magnets stuck to iron in any form, (though not stainless in case that includes
some Ferrous component, as I am no expert on the chemical makeup of stainless
steel) Vic "Splash Nelson with the '67 "Split Personality"


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
 
B

Brian Crombie

Guest
Vic,
A magnet will be drawn to a cast automotive componant as quickly as it will be
drawn to wood. That's why I said the (metal) cover plate would be an optional
location. If your interested in rare earth magnets, go to Ebay and do a search
for them. The guy I bought mine from is still operating under the handle PIE.
He currently has some 1" cubes up for bid. The ones I bought came with a piece
of cloth seperating them so you could get them apart. Heed his warnings too.
Even the little ones I bought could easily pinch the skin when handling two of
them. They are fun to play with and have many uses including demagnetizing the
wife's Visa card!

Brian Crombie
----- Original Message -----



Brian -
Out of curiosity: Your remark that the rare earth magnets would not
stick to cast iron. This is news to me, and I presume from your statement that
that is the case. What do they stick to? Just to themselves? I thought all
magnets stuck to iron in any form, (though not stainless in case that includes
some Ferrous component, as I am no expert on the chemical makeup of stainless
steel) Vic "Splash Nelson with the '67 "Split Personality"



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
 
B

Bill Connelly

Guest
While I've never placed magnets anywhere near the gear boxes (I change my
gear oil along with all other lubricants at the end of every season as a
part of regular "winterization maintenance" anyhow...Maybe that's
"overkill", but that's just what I do, and with no complaints after nearly
10 years of fairly demanding operation. See
www.geocities.com/soho/8389/winterization.html for details), I HAVE found
that a couple of large magnets slapped under the bottom of my gas tank have
worked wonders with keeping the rusty cruds out of my fuel line, which
became a real issue after having replaced the original snorkel type fuel tap
with a non-standard straight-out tap. I gather it would also help folks with
original style taps and occasional fuel line or tap bowl filter clogging
issues (at least until you feel like pulling the fuel tank for a proper
cleaning, etching and sealing). In principle, one would imagine that
magnets would help keep similar steely nasties in their place in the
trannies too, or anywhere else. Just make awfully damned sure those magnets
are well secured away from the working parts! I would never want to rely on
their "sheer magnetism" to hold them in place INSIDE a gear case. In fact,
were it me, I would instead consider attaching dime or smaller-sized magnets
directly onto the water and land tranny drain screws OUTSIDE of the case.
These screws would then conductively attract whatever ferric flotsam was
afoot AND also retract same on the drain screws' removal.

While on the topic of trannies, I've just had an opportunity to try out
Allan Woodcock's recent "shifting tip" (see
http://www.escribe.com/automotive/amphicar/m10424.html ), and I must concur
that it seems to work a charm! I did troll around likely places on the 'net
looking for some kind of confirmation of the principle, but found nothing
blatant, so I just went out and tried it myself: Stopping at stop lights and
with the clutch in, I would drop it into 2nd, then neutral, then 1st, then
back to neutral. Once the light turned green, the subsequent shifts from
1st to second WERE invariably and noticeably more gentle and direct after
dropping it into second--neutral--first--neutral than without. So it does
seem to work. Thanks Allan!

~Bilgey~


Greetings all,
A while back, I had my Bombardier trail groomer worked on. The mechanic
that replaced my steering bands suggested that I place a magnet in the gear
oil to pick up any particles that may have been left behind. I happened to
have some rare earth magnets so I put one in an area far away from any
moving parts. These magnets measure 1" x 3/4" and was no thicker than say
three nickels stacked on top of each other. They are also about ten times
stronger than the average magnet so I'm not worried about it moving.
Last week, I ground the splines off of one driveshaft at the tranny due to
no axle springs. For some reason, the springs were not put back on both
sides after someone worked on it. This is on the Amphi that I just bought.
I was able to reach in the tunnel and with my finger remove most of the
spline chunks. I do intend on flushing it and wonder if a rare earth magnet
would be advisable. I believe magnets, even rare earth won't stick to cast
iron but it would stick to the cover plate on the passenger side. As long
as it does not interfere with any moving parts, it should work fine. Was
wondering if anyone else has done this in the past.

Thanks in advance for your input.

Brian Crombie
Faribault, Mn.
 
N

nelson625@aol.com

Guest
Brian -
thanks for the information. Very interesting. I'm blessed with a wife
who is very sparing with the charge cards. I'm the one she has to watch !. Vic


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