new replacement Carburetor

okey0

Member
someone awhile back started a thread about the new carbs that gordons is selling as a direct bolt on replacements, but if I recall, it took a little bit of effort to get it to work. I think that is one of the threads that got lost in the shuffle. could whoever did that repost your efforts to install, and provide an update on how it is working out?
 

LSolheim

Member
That was me, Gerald, and you are correct as that thread appears to be missing.

As I began the original post: this was not the simple "drop-in" replacement, as advertised.

Most recent first: All is OK w/ the new carb. I still have an occasional miss or hesitation (more like a hick-up) that I can't quite resolve. It is very intermittent so am living with it at the moment.

Good news: no leaks (or smell) from this carb. The original ran fine, but even after a couple of rebuilds over the years I could not keep the throttle plate bushings (& even choke plate to a lessor extent) from seeping fuel.

Still disappointed about needing to remove the phenolic spacer between the carb & manifold (this carb has a thicker base and I could not retain it & my little heat shield w/o replacing the manifold studs w/ longer ones), but I added some extra gaskets for "insulation" and have tightened the nuts several times to insure elimination of vacuum leaks.

The fuel input port is higher on this carb creating a "bulb" that interferes with the stock flame arrestor. I ended up machining a relief in the FA housing to clear. The vacuum advance port is also slightly relocated requiring some "tweaking" of the vacuum line, and the 'choke' (now enrichment) cable is retained differently & I had to drill open that recess for fitment of the cable. There was another issue, but I can't recall at the moment.
Pic 1: Interference Pic 3: Machined & new fuel input Pic 4: view from aft (note choke cable relocation) Pic 5: view from starboard

All-in-all having made the swap I am OK, but have elected NOT to return the original carb for the (unnecessary, in my opinion) 'core charge refund' (this is a new item), "just-in-case".
 

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okey0

Member
it looks like you are using a rubber fuel line from the fuel pump up to the carb, instead of the metal line that mine has. Is that a mod you made or did that all come with the new carb? I've thought about doing that myself, as running a hose around the back of the engine (over the clutch housing) would seem cooler than running the metal line over the top of the engine.
 

LSolheim

Member
it looks like you are using a rubber fuel line from the fuel pump up to the carb, instead of the metal line that mine has. Is that a mod you made or did that all come with the new carb? I've thought about doing that myself, as running a hose around the back of the engine (over the clutch housing) would seem cooler than running the metal line over the top of the engine.
Yes. I rerouted from the fuel pump to the carb like that using a flex hose some years ago to help remedy a vapor locking problem. In that picture the 5/16 fuel line is inside a piece of 5/8 heater hose as added insulation. Subsequent to the carburetor installation & photos I ran all new fuel line (full length of the car) and decided to remove that heater hose as I decided it may actually trap heat.
 

SNOWBIRD

Amphicar Expert
For those that want the proper Carb.. I have a small stock of Rebuilt ready to go Carbs.
in pics the chock cable looks to have a very sharp bend,
 

LSolheim

Member
The radius on that 180° bend certainly got a bit smaller as the enrichment connection is on the opposite side of the carb (port) from the standard choke attachment (starboard), but fortunately it works OK. I was considering running the cable closer to the muffler .... glad I didn't have to.
 

Cap'n John

Member
The best way to insulate the line is not with rubber as that will allow heat in but not out making the problem worse. Get actual fuel line heat shield. It is a proper reflective insulation specifically for fuel lines. It's available at most reasonable parts stores or online (look for racing stuff) Whereas rubber will allow heat in and hold it (insulating properties) the fuel line insulation I mentioned will reflect the heat away rather than allowing it in (reflective properties). It is a silver reflective tube material that slips over the lines. No need to relocate or replace your lines.

I eliminated the troublesome original Solex carb in favor of twin SU carbs years ago. Now when it sits for months all winter, I turn on the electric fuel pump until I know fuel it at the carb and turn it off (still have the mechanical pump), merely by looking at my key and she will start immediately and idle smoothly. Even when warm, with a touch of the key (no cranking, just a tap of the starter) she fires right up. They were not cheap, but worth every dollar as I have had ZERO problems in the 10 years since, no adjustments nor repairs. The key is to have a QUALIFIED technician who knows those SU carbs well rebuild it properly. Mine cost $600 for the rebuilt of the 2 carbs.

If your carb is questionable and that is your preference, give Gord Souter a call and get a correct original rather than the replacement carb that is not a drop in replacement for similar money.
 

LSolheim

Member
The best way to insulate the line is not with rubber as that will allow heat in but not out making the problem worse. Get actual fuel line heat shield. It is a proper reflective insulation specifically for fuel lines. It's available at most reasonable parts stores or online (look for racing stuff) Whereas rubber will allow heat in and hold it (insulating properties) the fuel line insulation I mentioned will reflect the heat away rather than allowing it in (reflective properties). It is a silver reflective tube material that slips over the lines. No need to relocate or replace your lines.
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Super suggestion, John. Thanks
 

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