Nav light

F

fouramphis

Guest
I have 1 NOS front nav. light lens with gasket.
It is probably the only new unused light still around.
and is for sale but the price is very high!!!!!
To much for me to put on even my best car, and its a real good car.
Yes your beter of to buy the repros, as they all fade very quickly
on ones hood ,but if you must have new original I have it.
GORD SOUTER.(price is on my parts list)
 
C

Craig Taylor

Guest
On the subject of nav lights... Mine is in exalent condition. So good I suspect
it might not be an original. Is there a way to tell them apart from the repos?
My car spent 17 years in a locked conex in Fairbanks so that my explain it's
condition...

Craig in Alaska
Red 66 Amphicar(RDUCKY)


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W

WB6WSN

Guest
----- Original Message -----
From: Craig Taylor
To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, December 30, 2003 8:22 AM
Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] Nav light


On the subject of nav lights... Mine is in exalent condition. So good I
suspect it might not be an original. Is there a way to tell them apart from the
repos? My car spent 17 years in a locked conex in Fairbanks

Uhhh, what's a "conex"?

Ed
El Cajon
67 Rust Guppy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
 
C

Craig Taylor

Guest
I guess that's an Alaskan term... Its slang for the big steel box used to
transport goods by truck or ship. Over the years alot of them have found there
way here and been used as make shift garages. I've even seen people make houses
out of them in the bush...

Craig in Alaska
Red 66 Amphicar(RDUCKY)


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N

nelson625@aol.com

Guest
Craig
I personally am most familiar with the descriptive term "Sea-Land"
containers which are the same as what you have described. However, I'm about as
far from Alaska as one can get in the U.S., being in Florida. However, at our
Florida Ports, from the air, I have seen these containers piled up by the
hundreds, possibly thousands, awaiting transfer either to ships or to trucks.
What
might the term Conex be derived from - do you know? The Sea-Land is obvious
enough. I known that nowadays, such containers are a tremendous hazard to small
boat navigation at sea or mid-ocean. I was an extended cruising sailor and
with each passing year, they are more of a worry, as they slide off ships in
rough weather all too often, yet often float indefinitely, depending on the
buoyancy of their contents and how tight their sealing surfaces may be.
Vic "Splash" Nelson with the '67 "Split Personality"
near Daytona


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B

Bill Connelly

Guest
In response to the question below about the derivation of the term "Conex"
as referring to those shed-like metal shipping containers, apparently the
term is a U.S. Armed Forces acronym for "CONtainer EXpress". Source: U.S.
Army Field Manual FM-55-17 'Cargo Specialists Handbook' (16 Feb 1999) online
at http://www.adtdl.army.mil/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/fm/55-17/gloss.htmt .

~Bilgey~

----- Original Message -----

Craig
I personally am most familiar with the descriptive term "Sea-Land"
containers which are the same as what you have described. However, I'm about
as far from Alaska as one can get in the U.S., being in Florida. However, at
our Florida Ports, from the air, I have seen these containers piled up by
the hundreds, possibly thousands, awaiting transfer either to ships or to
trucks. What might the term Conex be derived from - do you know? The
Sea-Land is obvious enough. I known that nowadays, such containers are a
tremendous hazard to small boat navigation at sea or mid-ocean. I was an
extended cruising sailor and with each passing year, they are more of a
worry, as they slide off ships in rough weather all too often, yet often
float indefinitely, depending on the buoyancy of their contents and how
tight their sealing surfaces may be.

Vic "Splash" Nelson with the '67 "Split Personality" near Daytona





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O

Okins, Gerald E

Guest
After you see one get dropped from a crane, you will know that they can also
be called "CONtainer EXpendable".

G.O.

Message: 4
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 13:43:05 -0500
From: "Bill Connelly" <billiam@erols.com>
Subject: Re: Nav light

In response to the question below about the derivation of the
term "Conex"
as referring to those shed-like metal shipping containers,
apparently the
term is a U.S. Armed Forces acronym for "CONtainer EXpress".
Source: U.S.
Army Field Manual FM-55-17 'Cargo Specialists Handbook' (16 Feb
1999) online
at http://www.adtdl.army.mil/cgi-
bin/atdl.dll/fm/55-17/gloss.htmt .

~Bilgey~



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