Gluv-it and Silicone

R

Randy Tusone

Guest
Hey all,

I would like to let you know about a car that is
currently in our shop. The car had been restored,
years ago, using lots of Gluv-it. Well, that turned
out to be a very bad thing for that amphi because the
gluv-it does not flex (like the metal of the car does)
and tends to come up and let small quantities of water
get underneath. Wherever the gluv-it was used on this
car, very bad rust was found.

For example: Gluv-it was used around the frame
sub-rails, the hull there needed to be replaced, as
well as, large portions of the sub-frame where the
gluv-it had been used.

Silicone is a bit more flexible, however, if it does
not truly make a chemical bond with the metal, it will
also lift and allow water underneath. As can the
POR-15. If you want to use something on a rusty area
that is in decent enough shape to keep and you want to
treat it, there is a Marhyde product that works really
well.

Be cautious.
Randy

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D

David Chapman

Guest
> years ago, using lots of Gluv-it. Well, that turned
> out to be a very bad thing for that amphi because the
> gluv-it does not flex (like the metal of the car does)
> and tends to come up and let small quantities of water
> get underneath. Wherever the gluv-it was used on this
> car, very bad rust was found.

I've ALWAYS said this ! It's the main reason I would never use a product like
Gluv-it on my cars !

You need good solid metal (if not weld in new) then lead to cover any
imperfections or very small holes, then a standard automotive paint system,
starting with an etch primer, then finally lots of wax (my favourite is Waxoyl
but there are other similar products available in the US).

David Chapman
 

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