Finally, a solution to amphi shocks & springs

G

glennyrosa

Guest
I got tired and sometimes frightened listening to what some folks
are doing out there with aftermarket shocks for their Amphi's. I
gave Hugh a call last week and ordered a set of his shocks for my
early model
amphi. They're not inexpensive by any means, but this should not be
the deterant for not using them. Hugh went to great lengths to have
a shock built that not only looks great but fits perfect and is
designed for the unusual environment we expose them to. The springs
(powder coated) are adjustable to fine tune your car so that it sets
perfectly plumb. They also come with an adjustable metered orifice
so that you can set your ride to your own comfort level. They also
appear to be milled from a billet of aluminum so they're not going
to rust. I spent just over an hour installing my shocks. This task
was one of the easier repairs I've done to my car. I'll post
another report after my road test in a few days. If they perform
half as good as they look I'll be very very happy. My old shocks
were original, worn, and leaked (of all things) water. I figured
that when the car enters the water and the shock extends it drew
water in from around the piston shaft. These new shocks are
designed in a way to keep water out. And what happens to your shock
when it's full of water and it freezes outside. I know what it does
to my water pipes.

For something that is so important to the safety of your vehicle and
its passengers it's foolish to even dream about cutting new threads
or welding new brackets to an off-the-shelf shock. This is a no
brainer. Bite the bullet and give Hugh a call.

glenn

p.s. I was okay with my old shocks. The noise they made and the
listing down and to the left whenever coming to a stop. Got use to
that. But then I ordered a set of BFG whitewalls. Do you have any
idea what a set of worn shocks can do to the life of a new tire? Is
there anyone out there who doesn't balance their wheels and tires?
It's that important.

g
 
M

Marc Schlemmer

Guest
I have Hugh's shocks on my Amphi....and am more than happy with
them. The rears have been on for four years or so...and the fronts
for one. No problem with "bottoming" out - I used Hugh's
recommendation and backed the retaining nut all the way down and have
never had a problem. (My fronts are the thru-the-hull type).
I agree...I would trust a real shock from Hugh over a welded up one
anyday.

Marc Schlemmer.


--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "glennyrosa" <glennyrosa@...>
wrote:
>
> I got tired and sometimes frightened listening to what some folks
> are doing out there with aftermarket shocks for their Amphi's. I
> gave Hugh a call last week and ordered a set of his shocks for my
> early model
> amphi. They're not inexpensive by any means, but this should not
be
> the deterant for not using them. Hugh went to great lengths to
have
> a shock built that not only looks great but fits perfect and is
> designed for the unusual environment we expose them to. The
springs
> (powder coated) are adjustable to fine tune your car so that it
sets
> perfectly plumb. They also come with an adjustable metered orifice
> so that you can set your ride to your own comfort level. They also
> appear to be milled from a billet of aluminum so they're not going
> to rust. I spent just over an hour installing my shocks. This
task
> was one of the easier repairs I've done to my car. I'll post
> another report after my road test in a few days. If they perform
> half as good as they look I'll be very very happy. My old shocks
> were original, worn, and leaked (of all things) water. I figured
> that when the car enters the water and the shock extends it drew
> water in from around the piston shaft. These new shocks are
> designed in a way to keep water out. And what happens to your
shock
> when it's full of water and it freezes outside. I know what it
does
> to my water pipes.
>
> For something that is so important to the safety of your vehicle
and
> its passengers it's foolish to even dream about cutting new threads
> or welding new brackets to an off-the-shelf shock. This is a no
> brainer. Bite the bullet and give Hugh a call.
>
> glenn
>
> p.s. I was okay with my old shocks. The noise they made and the
> listing down and to the left whenever coming to a stop. Got use to
> that. But then I ordered a set of BFG whitewalls. Do you have any
> idea what a set of worn shocks can do to the life of a new tire?
Is
> there anyone out there who doesn't balance their wheels and tires?
> It's that important.
>
> g
>
 
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