Engine oil

  • Thread starter martyandcaryl@charter.net
  • Start date
M

martyandcaryl@charter.net

Guest
We have just purchased a new car and want to start its life out right
with respect to our choice of oil. We discussed using Amsoil after
the brake in period is up. The salesman mentioned blending synthetic
with standard, I have never heard of doing this and am uncertain.
Any advice would be appreciated.

Another subject I am looking for help on is that we have 6 vehicles
that sleep outside while 5 others have garage space. Does anyone
know where we can purchase a few of those temporary garages that go
up over some kind of structure and is covered with plastic material?

We can't wait to swim with Dave The Wave at the Spring Valley swim in.

Marty & Caryl
BUOYANT in WI
64 Turq
 
C

Craig Taylor

Guest
Marty, I can't help you much on the oil issue but thought you might be
interested in a tent type garage I'm going to put up this summer. I
have two friends that have them and are very happy with them. They are
made by Cover All. 26' x 40' half dome shape with a 91/2x12 door and
sell for $5400 up here, probubly less down south. They are very well
made. 2" tube frame and a role up door. Here's a web site.
http://www.coverall.net/ Hope this helps.

Craig, Flat Lake Alaska

----- Original Message -----
From: martyandcaryl@charter.net
Date: Tuesday, May 8, 2001 9:27 am
Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Engine oil

> We have just purchased a new car and want to start its life out
> right
> with respect to our choice of oil. We discussed using Amsoil
> after
> the brake in period is up. The salesman mentioned blending
> synthetic
> with standard, I have never heard of doing this and am uncertain.
> Any advice would be appreciated.
>
> Another subject I am looking for help on is that we have 6
> vehicles
> that sleep outside while 5 others have garage space. Does anyone
> know where we can purchase a few of those temporary garages that
> go
> up over some kind of structure and is covered with plastic material?
>
> We can't wait to swim with Dave The Wave at the Spring Valley swim in.
>
> Marty & Caryl
> BUOYANT in WI
> 64 Turq
>
>
>
> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
> amphicar-lovers-unsubscribe@egroups.com
>
>
>
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
> http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
>
>
>
 
B

Bill Connelly

Guest
We have just purchased a new car and want to start its life out right
with respect to our choice of oil. We discussed using Amsoil after
the brake in period is up. The salesman mentioned blending synthetic
with standard, I have never heard of doing this and am uncertain.
Any advice would be appreciated.


How about a blend of store-bought guacamole and pure safflower oil? Then
you can squirt some Preparation-H into the crankcase to keep down harmful
nodules...

http://www.amphicar.net/amsoil
 
M

Mike Israel

Guest
--- martyandcaryl@charter.net wrote:
> We have just purchased a new car and want to start
> its life out right
> with respect to our choice of oil. We discussed
> using Amsoil after
> the brake in period is up. The salesman mentioned
> blending synthetic
> with standard, I have never heard of doing this and
> am uncertain.
> Any advice would be appreciated.
>

Why bother blending, you will not save much money
doing so versus pure synthetic.

Keep in mind that the factory fill on most high $$$
machinery (Corvette, Porsche, Ferrari) is 100%
synthetic. (Usually Mobil 1 or Agip Synt 2000).




__________________________________________________

Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices
http://auctions.yahoo.com/
 
B

B Crombie

Guest
----- Original Message -----




> Another subject I am looking for help on is that we have 6 vehicles
> that sleep outside while 5 others have garage space. Does anyone
> know where we can purchase a few of those temporary garages that go
> up over some kind of structure and is covered with plastic material?


Marty,
It just so happens that I work for a greenhouse manufacturer located in
southern Minnesota. Many of our non-grower customers use a particular model
call the EM for a variety of storage reasons. It's an engineered, hoop
style structure that has six foot tall straight side walls with a rounded
roof profile. Wall to wall it measures 21'-0" x 6' increments. Most all
Wal-Marts nationwide use a simular model with bells and whistles for plant
sales, yet the profile is the same as the EM.
Enough of my sales efforts! For more detailed information and a brochure,
give our office a call at 800.852.3443.
As far as "blending'' the two oils, I would feel comfortable draining the
old oil then adding the synthetic. I personally would not top off with
synthetic knowing standard oil is still in the engine. What's the
recommended break in mileage? 500, 1000? I would play it safe and change
it out now or at the end of the break in period. Just my 2 cents!

Brian Crombie
' 64 Red (Euro-Amphi)
 
W

www.amph.67@juno.com

Guest
"K" Mart sells two models without sides, $150.00 for peak roof. $175.00
for round roof. You can add sides with construction plastic as temp
storage. Look for that at Home Depot or Leows.
 
B

Bill Connelly

Guest
> http://www.amphicar.net/amsoil

> After reviewing the Amsoil page I see there is no real difference between
Amsoil and Mobile-1, [snip...]


Sorry, but the statement above is incorrect. In fact, right on the
abovementioned page at http://www.amphicar.net/amsoil is a comparative chart
where AMSOIL is clearly shown to be almost 3 times more effective a
lubricant as Mobil1 as measured in a standardized Four Ball Wear Test (ASTM
? 4172). Mobil1 is a fine product, sure, better than most other engine
oils, but it is NOT the best, or even close to it...AMSOIL is.

By the above wear test and all other measurements of an engine lubricant's
characteristics, such as its "Viscosity Index", "Flash Point", "Percentage
of Ash" and "Volatility", AMSOIL's whole range of motor oils outperforms
Mobil1's range hands down across the board. Sure, Mobil1 does better than
most other products by comparison, especially mineral-based non-synthetic
oils, but AMSOIL remains the proven pinnacle of quality. Yes, it's about a
buck more than Mobil1, but then again Mobil1 is about 3 bucks more than
generic dinosaur drippin's anyhow. The question is this: If you're gonna
rise above mediocre anyhow, isn't it worth a buck more to just go first
class?

As for the mixing of different types or brands of motor oils, synthetics or
standard, mentioned in a previous posting, this can be problematic in
practice due to the varied, often proprietary (i.e. unknown), additive
packages (various zinc compounds, polymers for "multigrade ranging", etc.)
found in various motor oil brands, particularly non-synthetics (AMSOIL adds
no such zinc or polymer additives in it's 10W30). What works passably to
reduce wear, say zinc, in one admixture or concentration may do nothing or
indeed harm in another. There are many synthetic/standard blends out there
now offered by various manufacturers such as Castrol, Quaker State, and even
generic store brands, where one assumes that such additive packages are
controlled, but while these brands perform better in many respects than
plain non-synthetics, they do not begin to approach the lubrication
effectiveness of any full synthetic, and are not even in the same zipcode on
charts of other desirable motor oil characteristics as AMSOIL.

My point with the earlier tongue-in-cheek suggestion about putting
guacamole, etc. in the crankcase was that in the end you can put any
lubricants you like in your Amphi, from AMSOIL on down to Cooking Oil.
After all, it's YOUR Amphi. You should just be aware of what you're
choosing: pay a little extra now or perhaps a whole lot more later. If you
don't mind pulling the engine and replacing the valve guides and main
bearings and shells every decade or so, or if you scarcely ever use your
Amphi anyhow, then perhaps a store-brand generic non-synthetic oil
(hopefully) changed every 3000 miles or at the end of every boating season,
whichever comes first, will work just fine for you. That's certainly what
you want to use breaking in a new or rebuilt engine. Why? Because you WANT
the lack of lubrication lesser lubricants offer...to a point. If, like me
on the other hand, you're all "broken in" just so anyhow and want to do
everything you can for your high-usage Amphi or other cherished rides to
indefinitely postpone having to wrestle that engine out for a rebuild, then
you'll spend that extra buck to get the very best tools available to reduce
wear and tear to a minimum: AMSOIL.

In closing, attached below is a text excerpt from message I sent some time
ago to another owner concerning the breaking in a rebuilt engine. I thought
it might be helpful to someone.

With Regards,

~Bilgemaster~


BREAKING IN YOUR REBUILT ENGINE

If you have just rebuilt your engine you should "run it in" using a
non-synthetic 10W30...whatever's on sale at the local auto supplies
shop--the cheaper the better. You will actually WANT that extra wear during
this first post-rebuild phase to help the engine's parts settle in. With
the trannies you can go straight to the AMSOIL after a rebuild, but even
here you might also want to do a "flush" using a cheaper non-synthetic GL-4
grade gear oil (absolutely NOT a GL-5, the extra additives of which can eat
your brass and other yellow metal parts). The flush will carry out any
machinings, metal and other dust and whatnots that may still be in there.
If you have any problems finding a straight GL-4 non-synthetic gear oil at
the local auto supplies joints then try the shelves of any marine goods
store. Lots of marine engines use straight GL-4 in their lower drive
sections. Once again: DO NOT USE GL-5. You will need about a gallon for
both trannies and the steering box. You might also get one of those handy
screwtop pump things while you're looking around for just a couple of bucks.
It'll also fit into your gallon size AMSOIL lube later and it's perfect for
filling Amphi trannies with one hand.

Once everything's topped off and ready for the first running, fire the beast
up. The Amphi's Herald engine is a nice primitive little brute and will
normally kick to life pretty quickly. In fact, mine started up after
fourteen years of sitting in a shed in Poughkeepsie while I was just
cleaning off the starter solenoid button's rubber. I pressed down a bit too
hard on the button and
"Vrrroooff!...blubbidy...blub!...blub!...blub!...blub!". Nevertheless, a
spray can of starter fluid with upper cylinder lubricant might be a nice
thing to have to keep from wearing down the battery if your rebuild's a
little "tight". If it doesn't start up after a couple-few tries, play the
manual choke at various settings fully in to fully out. If still no joy,
then suspect an electrical hookup problem. Nine times out of ten when
there's a problem folks discover on closer examination that they've got the
spark plug wires crossed or something else in the ignition circuit mis- or
disconnected. Always keep a fire extinguisher handy, just in case.

RUNNING IN:

1. Allow engine to idle until warm. While it's warming up, check for any
coolant or oil leaks. Once warm, shut it down.
2. Wait a few minutes and check the oil level. Too much is almost as bad as
too little. Adjust accordingly.
3. Restart engine and drive for several miles at varying engine speeds and
loads, keeping it under about 3000 rpm (under 45 mph in 4th gear). You will
want to vary the load and speed of the engine, not just idle it in the
driveway or drive at a single speed on a parkway. Stop and go traffic is
perfect. Run it in this fashion for the next 400 to 500 miles. Check oil
level frequently as it may burn a bit as the rings settle in. This is
normal.
4. Drain engine oil and change filter. "Examine the drippin's": Any big
metal chunks in there? Anything bigger than, say, a pencil lead? No?
Good.
5. Refill engine oil with AMSOIL 10W30 and an AMSOIL oil filter (details and
ordering at http://www.amphicar.net/amsoil).
6. Drain trannies and refill with AMSOIL GL4 Gear Oil (see
http://www.escribe.com/automotive/amphicar/m1923.html for the how-to)
7. Run gently but normally for the next 1000 or so miles, or until the end
of the "Boating Season", whichever comes first.
8. Drain engine oil and change oil filter. Refill with AMSOIL 10W30. Check
tranny oil condition and levels (See #6's link above; I change my tranny oil
as a matter of course at the end of every season, but as you might have
guessed by now, I'm kind of a lubricant fetishist).
9. Change oil and filter at the end of each season. Enjoy.

GREASE DURING ASSEMBLY:

1. Use only AMSOIL Water Resistant Synthetic Grease during assembly of all
running gear (wheel bearings, u-joints, prop assemblies, steering arms,
etc.). All other greases WILL turn into a greyish snot after only one
season and thereafter wash away. If you've already got standard goop in
there, you should replace it with the AMSOIL, particularly those wheel
bearings and the pain-in-the-ass u-joints nearest the tranny. With the
steering linkages and such, you can get away with simply greasing henceforth
only with AMSOIL, and it will simply replace the standard goop as that
dissolves away. The AMSOIL is perfectly compatible with any other grease
you happen to have in there.

ABOUT THE SPRAY:

In answer to your question, the AMSOIL Heavy Duty Metal Protector
Spray (see http://www.amphicar.net/amsoil/metalprotector.html) is indeed
basically an improved easy-to-use spray can version of that hard-to-find
WaxOyl stuff that British classics guys love to coat their rides in using
the rose sprayer.

Best of luck!
~Bilgemaster~
 

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