DOT 5 silicone brake fluid

J

John Friese

Guest
Someone at Celina said that silicone brake fluid absorbed water, which
came as a bit of a surprise to me. I just looked at my bottle of NAPA
DOT 5 silicone fluid and it says "it will NOT absorbe moisture".
Someone is wrong but I think I'll believe the bottle this time.
Someone else said it leaks a bit at the joints. I haven't found this
to be the case and even if it did, at least it wouldn't damage the
paint. I've switched both my cars to silicone and it's working fine
for me but I only did the switch a few months ago.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red
 
D

David Chapman

Guest
<table style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" bgColor="#ffffff">
<font face="Arial" size="2">Silicone brake fluid is perfect for Amphicar, it's all I've used in allmy Amphicars for around 20 years. I might not use it in a high performance new car as it is a bit more likely to vapour lock on systems with ABS - of course nota concern withAmphicar. Its big plus is lack of maintenance, I change it about once every 10 years when I change the rubbers in the wheel cylindersand flexibles (as preventative maintenance) but that is all it needs.</font>
<font face="Arial" size="2"></font>
<font face="Arial" size="2">It is hydrophobic, it actually repels water, unlike the conventional hydroscopic fluid. Hydroscopic makes it more tolerent to vapour lock and also makes the pedal slightly harder but also means the absorbed water corrodes which is why you have to change conventional fluidevery year or two. </font>
<font face="Arial" size="2"></font>
<font face="Arial" size="2">There are some reports that if you use silicone fluid in a car that has had conventional fluid for 40 years it will leak - this is because conventional fluid causes the rubbers to harden over time. When going to silicon you really need to clean it out completely (if only to get the water out) and replace all the rubber parts. </font>
<font face="Arial" size="2"></font>
<font face="Arial" size="2">Two reasons then why it is not used on new cars - in part the problem with ABS but the main reason is the lack of maintenance. Manufacturers make very little money on new cars - it all comes later with servicing - and unlike oil changes owners don't like to go elsewhere for work on brakes so manufacturers and service outlets continue with the conventional stuff to protect that revenue stream. </font>
<font face="Arial" size="2"></font>
<font face="Arial" size="2">And if you think manufacturers don't play those sort of games..... Well Google for Preston Tucker or EV1 </font>
<font face="Arial" size="2"></font>

<font face="Arial" size="2">David Chapman </font>
<font face="Arial" size="2"></font>
 
G

goob@twcny.rr.com

Guest
Manufacturers make very little money on new cars?? C'mon Dave!

Gary

----- Original Message -----
From: David Chapman <david@manbus.com>
Date: Monday, August 7, 2006 4:48 am
Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] DOT 5 silicone brake fluid
To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com

> Silicone brake fluid is perfect for Amphicar, it's all I've used
> in all my Amphicars for around 20 years. I might not use it in a
> high performance new car as it is a bit more likely to vapour lock
> on systems with ABS - of course not a concern with Amphicar. Its
> big plus is lack of maintenance, I change it about once every 10
> years when I change the rubbers in the wheel cylinders and
> flexibles (as preventative maintenance) but that is all it needs.
>
> It is hydrophobic, it actually repels water, unlike the
> conventional hydroscopic fluid. Hydroscopic makes it more tolerent
> to vapour lock and also makes the pedal slightly harder but also
> means the absorbed water corrodes which is why you have to change
> conventional fluid every year or two.
>
> There are some reports that if you use silicone fluid in a car
> that has had conventional fluid for 40 years it will leak - this
> is because conventional fluid causes the rubbers to harden over
> time. When going to silicon you really need to clean it out
> completely (if only to get the water out) and replace all the
> rubber parts.
>
> Two reasons then why it is not used on new cars - in part the
> problem with ABS but the main reason is the lack of maintenance.
> Manufacturers make very little money on new cars - it all comes
> later with servicing - and unlike oil changes owners don't like to
> go elsewhere for work on brakes so manufacturers and service
> outlets continue with the conventional stuff to protect that
> revenue stream.
>
> And if you think manufacturers don't play those sort of games.....
> Well Google for Preston Tucker or EV1
>
>
> David Chapman
>
 

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