Cleaning Brakeshoes

dutchamphi

Proud Sponsor of the Amphicar Digest
Hi All,

For almost one year I am the happy owner of an Amphicar and as advised I have been greasing the car on a regular basis.
Unfortunately I have done too much greasing on the beaing buddies and the rear bearings so that the brakeshoes have been smeared with grease.

Does anyone know a way on how to clean the brakeshoes? I have used brakecleaner several times but it seems like that the grease went into the shoes and gets squeezes out.

Robert de Vries
'63 Amphicar
 

tpls63

Member
In most cases when brake shoes become saturated with brake fluid or grease they need to be replaced. I don't know of any cleaner that will suck all the absorbed grease/fluid out of the linings.
Hi All,

For almost one year I am the happy owner of an Amphicar and as advised I have been greasing the car on a regular basis.
Unfortunately I have done too much greasing on the beaing buddies and the rear bearings so that the brakeshoes have been smeared with grease.

Does anyone know a way on how to clean the brakeshoes? I have used brakecleaner several times but it seems like that the grease went into the shoes and gets squeezes out.

Robert de Vries
'63 Amphicar
 

azpaul50

Member
I had one wheel like that and cleaning the shoes with regular brake fluid. It worked for exactly one stop. Nothing will help other than changing the linings. Speaking of that... I suppose some special material type lining is called for due to water use? All anyone has said is to use "non-mettalic" and to make sure it wasn't too thick to fit. great. - AZP



To: azpaul50@hotmail.com
Subject: RE: [General Amphicar Discussion-t-20902] Re: Cleaning Brakeshoes
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2010 15:34:37 -0400
From:





In most cases when brake shoes become saturated with brake fluid or grease they need to be replaced. I don't know of any cleaner that will suck all the absorbed grease/fluid out of the linings.


Quote:




Originally Posted by dutchamphi
Hi All,

For almost one year I am the happy owner of an Amphicar and as advised I have been greasing the car on a regular basis.
Unfortunately I have done too much greasing on the beaing buddies and the rear bearings so that the brakeshoes have been smeared with grease.

Does anyone know a way on how to clean the brakeshoes? I have used brakecleaner several times but it seems like that the grease went into the shoes and gets squeezes out.

Robert de Vries
'63 Amphicar
 

azpaul50

Member
uhhh... I meant regular brake cleaner.... not fluid. Duh, Paul! - AZP



To: azpaul50@hotmail.com
Subject: RE: [General Amphicar Discussion-t-20902] Re: Cleaning Brakeshoes
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2010 19:19:34 -0400
From:





I had one wheel like that and cleaning the shoes with regular brake fluid. It worked for exactly one stop. Nothing will help other than changing the linings. Speaking of that... I suppose some special material type lining is called for due to water use? All anyone has said is to use "non-mettalic" and to make sure it wasn't too thick to fit. great. - AZP



To: azpaul50@hotmail.com
Subject: RE: [General Amphicar Discussion-t-20902] Re: Cleaning Brakeshoes
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2010 15:34:37 -0400
From:





In most cases when brake shoes become saturated with brake fluid or grease they need to be replaced. I don't know of any cleaner that will suck all the absorbed grease/fluid out of the linings.


Quote:




Originally Posted by dutchamphi
Hi All,

For almost one year I am the happy owner of an Amphicar and as advised I have been greasing the car on a regular basis.
Unfortunately I have done too much greasing on the beaing buddies and the rear bearings so that the brakeshoes have been smeared with grease.

Does anyone know a way on how to clean the brakeshoes? I have used brakecleaner several times but it seems like that the grease went into the shoes and gets squeezes out.

Robert de Vries
'63 Amphicar
 

jfriese

Active Member
There is supposed to be a brake lining made for boat trailer brakes that is water resistant. If I were replacing the linings I would look for that. One time I used regular replacement brake lining and it took quite a while for them to dry after going in the water. I still use original linings and have occasionally cleaned grease from them with gasoline or have sanded away the top layer a bit. I'm not sure if anyone would suggest this but that's what I've done over the years.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red
 
S

SplitPersonality

Guest
For reasons that I don't really understand, other than replacing the wheel
cylinders a year or so ago, I have had no problem with my brake linings
which were probably ordered from Hugh Gordon by the fellow who restored the
car before I owned it. The principal brake problem I have been having is
forgetting to release the parking brake. Therefore, I am in the process of
contriving a switch which will make contact in the "ON" position when the
ignition is turned on and will show a bright pilot light on the dash to alert
me to release the brake at which time the light would go out. Has anyone
done this or have a good idea of the source for a mechanical brake switch or
other switch which could be hooked up to the park brake assembly to activate
when the brake is pulled on and then illuminate a dash light ? I picked up
a 1930-31 Model A switch, but have to do some refiguring to use it, as
when it is pulled, the contacts go "OFF" and in its static position, it is
"ON."
Vic Nelson
near Daytona with the 1967 Split Personality


In a message dated 10/4/2010 9:35:26 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
writes:

There is supposed to be a brake lining made for boat trailer brakes that
is water resistant. If I were replacing the linings I would look for that.
One time I used regular replacement brake lining and it took quite a while
for them to dry after going in the water. I still use original linings and
have occasionally cleaned grease from them with gasoline or have sanded away
the top layer a bit. I'm not sure if anyone would suggest this but that's
what I've done over the years.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red
 

Ken Chambers

Platinum Subscriber
Vic,

Regarding your Amphicar parking brake, I was taught many years ago to apply a parking brake very firmly - or not at all. A gently applied brake can easily be overlooked, until you smell overheated brakes or see smoke emanating from the wheel wells. A firmly applied brake would be very difficult to ignore when starting to drive. If you do rig up a light, however, let us know how it turns out.

Best,
Ken Chambers, CA
'64 Red


On Oct 4, 2010, at 7:53 PM, SplitPersonality wrote:


> For reasons that I don't really understand, other than replacing the wheel
> cylinders a year or so ago, I have had no problem with my brake linings
> which were probably ordered from Hugh Gordon by the fellow who restored the
> car before I owned it. The principal brake problem I have been having is
> forgetting to release the parking brake. Therefore, I am in the process of
> contriving a switch which will make contact in the "ON" position when the
> ignition is turned on and will show a bright pilot light on the dash to alert
> me to release the brake at which time the light would go out. Has anyone
> done this or have a good idea of the source for a mechanical brake switch or
> other switch which could be hooked up to the park brake assembly to activate
> when the brake is pulled on and then illuminate a dash light ? I picked up
> a 1930-31 Model A switch, but have to do some refiguring to use it, as
> when it is pulled, the contacts go "OFF" and in its static position, it is
> "ON."
> Vic Nelson
> near Daytona with the 1967 Split Personality
 

chasgould

New Member
The simplest switch to rig up would be the rear brake light switch from a late model motorcycle, like a Kawasaki Ninja 250, which is a small plastic casing, with a pull type plunger attached to a spring, which when drawn away from the body of the switch, makes contact. They have a threaded base, which can be easily mounted discreetly under the dash, and simply attach the pull spring to the brake handle or rod, and when it is pulled up, the warning light will illuminate. These switches are readily available, cheap to purchase, infinitely adjustable so that the light will come on as soon as the brake is pulled up slightly. They are also small, and easy to install.
Chas


Vic,

Regarding your Amphicar parking brake, I was taught many years ago to apply a parking brake very firmly - or not at all. A gently applied brake can easily be overlooked, until you smell overheated brakes or see smoke emanating from the wheel wells. A firmly applied brake would be very difficult to ignore when starting to drive. If you do rig up a light, however, let us know how it turns out.

Best,
Ken Chambers, CA
'64 Red


On Oct 4, 2010, at 7:53 PM, SplitPersonality wrote:
 
John F: I did the same thing with my brakes and they stop great.
Paul From NY 67blue 67 red



To: pvcj@hotmail.com
Subject: RE: [General Amphicar Discussion-t-20902] Re: Cleaning Brakeshoes
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2010 21:34:13 -0400
From:





There is supposed to be a brake lining made for boat trailer brakes that is water resistant. If I were replacing the linings I would look for that. One time I used regular replacement brake lining and it took quite a while for them to dry after going in the water. I still use original linings and have occasionally cleaned grease from them with gasoline or have sanded away the top layer a bit. I'm not sure if anyone would suggest this but that's what I've done over the years.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red
 

SNOWBIRD

Amphicar Expert
Once brake linings are contaminated with grease they are usually done.
I have had success with leaving them in clean varsal for a week then sun drying for a few days, Did this to 1 front set on Jeepster and is still on there working good 4 years later. BTW.. Its running great now that Dist. has a ground.Today Im hooking 12V turn signals to it.
I have sold 100s of Amphicar brake linings to owners, they are a special water resistant material similar to Milatary's Hummer . Found a company that did it for us back in 02 and as long as you replace all 4 wheels, and make sure the wheel cyl, are in perfect working order, you can lock up tires and skid to a stop fresh out of water,,, well maybe I'm exadurating but the work 100% better than Original ones.They are sold on a exchange only program so that I can keep getting them for future Amphicar's, but threw the help of John C, I do have a better stock now.There are a few Owners(that are on this chat) that have NOT returned the core but 99% keep there part of the bargain.
 
S

SplitPersonality

Guest
Ken,

The parking brake handle arrangement in the Amphicars is similar to what a
number of cars used in the 40s and 50s. I find that one like the air
cooled VW beetles used and which my 2002 Saturn has is much easier to pull up
tight. With my Saturn, it is difficult to move without releasing it, but the
degree of "tightness" that I can generally achieve with the system in the
Amphicar does not prevent me from driving away with it still engaged.
Anyway, I'll keep you posted, as I think the idea I described is worthwhile.

Just today I found an unusual switch at a flea market, so I can't say
what it's source is or where to find another. However, it may work out well.
As a humorous aside, This sizeable Flea Market is in Pennsylvania in Amish
country and has the distinction of only being open on Tuesdays, but they
say it has been open every Tuesday since 1924 ! That is not the humorous
aspect. This fellow had a box like a shoe box with half a dozen switches in it
for $1.00 each. I studied the various switches and selected two, including
the one I previously mentioned. I took out $2.00 and offered it to him
with the 2 switches in my hand. To my surprise, he asked if I would like the
"whole box for ONE DOLLAR ?" Will wonders never cease ? Of course I said
"fine." I like to accumulate all kinds of small switches which often fill
a need when I am working on some project.

This does not mean that this project automatically jumps to the top of my
overall "To
Do list," but having left the Parking Brake on twice now, it will
definitely get done.
Vic Nelson near Daytona with the "Split
Personality"





In a message dated 10/5/2010 7:19:36 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
writes:

Vic,

Regarding your Amphicar parking brake, I was taught many years ago to
apply a parking brake very firmly - or not at all. A gently applied brake can
easily be overlooked, until you smell overheated brakes or see smoke
emanating from the wheel wells. A firmly applied brake would be very difficult to
ignore when starting to drive. If you do rig up a light, however, let us
know how it turns out.

Best,
Ken Chambers, CA
'64 Red


On Oct 4, 2010, at 7:53 PM, SplitPersonality wrote:



Quote:

> For reasons that I don't really understand, other than replacing the
wheel

> cylinders a year or so ago, I have had no problem with my brake linings
> which were probably ordered from Hugh Gordon by the fellow who restored
the

> car before I owned it. The principal brake problem I have been having is
> forgetting to release the parking brake. Therefore, I am in the process
of

> contriving a switch which will make contact in the "ON" position when
the

> ignition is turned on and will show a bright pilot light on the dash to
alert

> me to release the brake at which time the light would go out. Has anyone
> done this or have a good idea of the source for a mechanical brake
switch or

> other switch which could be hooked up to the park brake assembly to
activate

> when the brake is pulled on and then illuminate a dash light ? I picked
up

> a 1930-31 Model A switch, but have to do some refiguring to use it, as
> when it is pulled, the contacts go "OFF" and in its static position, it
is

> "ON."
> Vic Nelson
> near Daytona with the 1967 Split Personality
 

jfriese

Active Member
Say Guys,

See my post with photos of the hand brake light system in one of my cars. I put it in the tips section.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red
 

dutchamphi

Proud Sponsor of the Amphicar Digest
Problem solved! I tried to clean the brakeshoes in a similar way as Gord described. I took a small bucket and left the brakeshoes soaking for 2 nights in thinner. Thinner really dissolves the grease. After refitting the brakeshoes the car brakes as new again. Thanks for sharing your ideas.

Robert de Vries
 

Bilgemaster

Member
Just for the record, there's something called "fuller's earth." It's
recommended in my old Norton motorcycle manuals especially for the cleaning
of brake shoes fouled by oil or grease. Frankly, I always wondered what the
hell it might be...like, maybe "fuller's earth" was just another arcane and
hard-to-understand British term like "spanner" or "gudgeon" or
"maintenance-free Lucas switch." Turns out that there is such a stuff as
"fullers earth", and that you can get it from auto supplies joints. See:
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-fullers-earth.htm

Regards,
Bilgey



---Original Message-----
From: dutchamphi [mailto:]
Sent: Saturday, October 09, 2010 3:10 AM
To: oldbuoy@comcast.net
Subject: RE: [General Amphicar Discussion-t-20902] Re: Cleaning Brakeshoes



Problem solved! I tried to clean the brakeshoes in a similar way as Gord
described. I took a small bucket and left the brakeshoes soaking for 2
nights in thinner. Thinner really dissolves the grease. After refitting the
brakeshoes the car brakes as new again. Thanks for sharing your ideas.

Robert de Vries
 

Tedredamphi

Platinum Subscriber
If you read the link that Bilgey quoted, you will see that "Fuller's Earth" is a component of kitty litter. And kitty litter seems to work as good as the stuff you buy from the auto supply store for soaking up grease on the floor. Now we just need someone to try putting their greased soaked brake shoes in kitty litter!!!!
Ted
 

Bilgemaster

Member
..And I read somewhere that the cheaper the kitty litter the more
"fuller's earth" it'll have. So, unless you need your brake shoes
smelling "minty fresh", just grab a generic bag of "Kit-E-Crap."

Bilgey


On Sat, Oct 9, 2010 6:32 pm, Tedredamphi wrote:

> If you read the link that Bilgey quoted, you will see that "Fuller's
> Earth" is a component of kitty litter. And kitty litter seems to work
> as good as the stuff you buy from the auto supply store for soaking up
> grease on the floor. Now we just need someone to try putting their
> greased soaked brake shoes in kitty litter!!!!
> Ted
>
>
 
S

SplitPersonality

Guest
Thanks Charles.
That sounds like the best way to go to me too so that a minor pull on the
park brake handle would do the trick when the ignition was on. Vic




In a message dated 10/5/2010 8:01:23 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
writes:

The simplest switch to rig up would be the rear brake light switch from a
late model motorcycle, like a Kawasaki Ninja 250, which is a small plastic
casing, with a pull type plunger attached to a spring, which when drawn
away from the body of the switch, makes contact. They have a threaded base,
which can be easily mounted discreetly under the dash, and simply attach the
pull spring to the brake handle or rod, and when it is pulled up, the
warning light will illuminate. These switches are readily available, cheap to
purchase, infinitely adjustable so that the light will come on as soon as the
brake is pulled up slightly. They are also small, and easy to install.
Chas



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Chambers
(mip://040d3890/showthread.php?p=42283#post42283)
Vic,

Regarding your Amphicar parking brake, I was taught many years ago to
apply a parking brake very firmly - or not at all. A gently applied brake can
easily be overlooked, until you smell overheated brakes or see smoke
emanating from the wheel wells. A firmly applied brake would be very difficult to
ignore when starting to drive. If you do rig up a light, however, let us
know how it turns out.

Best,
Ken Chambers, CA
'64 Red


On Oct 4, 2010, at 7:53 PM, SplitPersonality wrote:
 

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