Big Fire Hazard?

J

John Friese

Guest
All this talk about bilge blower size and sealed electricals makes
these cars sound real dangerous but then I realize that I've never
once heard of an Amphicar exploding from fumes in the bilge and that
includes those non U.S. cars that never had bilge blowers at all.
Given that these cars have been around for over 40 years and their
explosion rate is nil, I suspect you're making a big deal over
nothing.

P.S. The original gas shut off works fine and doesn't leak if the
seal disk gets replaced say every 20 or 30 years. Hugh doesn't sell
that replacement disks at this time but I can get them.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red
 
W

WB6WSN

Guest
<table bgColor="#ffffff">
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<blockquote style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message -----
<div style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: black">From: John Friese
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Sent: Thursday, November 25, 2004 8:55 AM
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Big Fire Hazard?

<tt>

All this talk about bilge blower size and sealed electricals makes
these cars sound real dangerous but then I realize that I've never
once heard of an Amphicar exploding from fumes in the bilge and that
includes those non U.S. cars that never had bilge blowers at all.
Given that these cars have been around for over 40 years and their
explosion rate is nil, I suspect you're making a big deal over
nothing.

P.S. The original gas shut off works fine and doesn't leak if the
seal disk gets replaced say every 20 or 30 years. Hugh doesn't sell
that replacement disks at this time but I can get them.

John Friese
67 White
67 Red



</blockquote>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4">John, your point is well-taken. A lot of issues look huge when you use a microscope (optical or verbal <g>).</font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4">Although your chances of being incinerated in a Pinto are very small, if you were rebuilding one from the frame up, you would do well to re-consider the fuel system. As many of us get into the Amphi innards much deeper than the average motorist, we are presented with many choices of repair andrestore to original condition, or to improvise and improve (uhh, we hope).</font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4">Some of us send a check to Hugh, slap in the new bearings, and get on with their life. And then there are some of us who contemplate the true function of the ball races and how they are affected by the oil additives and......</font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4">Come on John, I know you're a contemplater!</font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font face="Times New Roman" color="#0000ff" size="4">Ed
El Cajon, CA USA
67 Rust Guppy
</font>
</tt>
 
J

John Friese

Guest
Hi Ed,

Yes, I spend a lot of time thinking about improvements for the
Amphicar. Generally I spend the most time trying to work on items
that have been real problems for owners like the clutch system,
negative ground conversions and various water sealing issues like
door seals and the large style bilge plug. I really like to have
things like the gas gauge work correctly and read accurately. I
think the original fuel shut offs, with their reserve function, are
neat too. Hey, it was a good enough system for Porsche. I also like
a smooth clutch and a dry car. I balance these needs with my desire
to keep the car as original looking as possible. None of my
modifications require any additional holes in the car. In fact, my
modifications don't require any changes at all that couldn't be put
back to completely stock condition if one should desire to do so in
the future. Things I do improve performance but don't change the car
from it's original appearance. I understand some people want to make
big obvious changes but that's not me. I also know people who are so
into stock that they would rather have the cheap original interior
(even with tears) than a new, marine vinyl interior. That's not me
either.

I did wonder about that little tube from the defroster duct to the
bilge blower and never could figure it out. Inside the blower
housing there is a divider plate that separates the fan section from
the motor section. That tube goes into the motor section and doesn't
really get any air movement at all. It certainly doesn't provide any
air into the main stream. All that air comes from the larger tube
down in the bilge. After seeing the thread about it I called Hugh to
see if he knew anything about it. He doesn't. It's just a mystery I
guess. My best guess is that they wanted to allow any ozone from the
motor brushes to be able to get out of the housing since ozone is
corrosive. Really though, that seems a bit lame. I've never seen
such a thing any other places motors were enclosed. In fact the
motor in that blower is pretty much a sealed unit anyway and I don't
remember seeing any openings in it's housing.

John Friese

--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "WB6WSN" <wb6wsn@c...>
wrote:
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: John Friese
> To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Thursday, November 25, 2004 8:55 AM
> Subject: [amphicar-lovers] Big Fire Hazard?
>
>
>
> All this talk about bilge blower size and sealed electricals
makes
> these cars sound real dangerous but then I realize that I've
never
> once heard of an Amphicar exploding from fumes in the bilge and
that
> includes those non U.S. cars that never had bilge blowers at
all.
> Given that these cars have been around for over 40 years and
their
> explosion rate is nil, I suspect you're making a big deal over
> nothing.
>
> P.S. The original gas shut off works fine and doesn't leak if the
> seal disk gets replaced say every 20 or 30 years. Hugh doesn't
sell
> that replacement disks at this time but I can get them.
>
> John Friese
> 67 White
> 67 Red
>
>
>
>
>
> John, your point is well-taken. A lot of issues look huge when you
use a microscope (optical or verbal <g>).
>
> Although your chances of being incinerated in a Pinto are very
small, if you were rebuilding one from the frame up, you would do
well to re-consider the fuel system. As many of us get into the Amphi
innards much deeper than the average motorist, we are presented with
many choices of repair and restore to original condition, or to
improvise and improve (uhh, we hope).
>
> Some of us send a check to Hugh, slap in the new bearings, and get
on with their life. And then there are some of us who contemplate the
true function of the ball races and how they are affected by the oil
additives and......
>
> Come on John, I know you're a contemplater!
>
> Ed
> El Cajon, CA USA
> 67 Rust Guppy
 
M

markr132001

Guest
John,

Your performance enhancements have proven to be some of the most
beneficial in my humble opinion to the operation of a 50's designed
Amphicar in todays driving enviornment. You are my Amphibion of the
year nominee. (got that John?)

I will continue to support you by buying your innovative and problem
solving solutions to the Amphi as it competes on the road to the
average vehicle (other than a tractor).

I use Amsoil products, including the oil with no problems. I change
it every 3000 miles or 10 years, which ever comes first. Just
kidding.

My 1500 Spit motor is at the shop right now for final assembly. I
had a guy call the other day (I work at Wells Ignition Products) who
converts points distributors to electronic, and he had nothing good
to say about the Petronix units in general. He has seen many
failures in the GM versions and gives them a low mark for
reliability. Seeing nothing here, I am stumped, except that very few
are converted and low miles are clocked on the units.

Given to the fact that I will buy one, I have been wondering if
there have been any documented failures.

No longer in Tennessee, I am the Wisconsin Winnebago Amphi Man
wishing all a happy turkey day.

Later, Mark Richardson


--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "John Friese" <jfriese@m...>
wrote:
>
> Hi Ed,
>
> Yes, I spend a lot of time thinking about improvements for the
> Amphicar. Generally I spend the most time trying to work on items
> that have been real problems for owners like the clutch system,
> negative ground conversions and various water sealing issues like
> door seals and the large style bilge plug. I really like to have
> things like the gas gauge work correctly and read accurately. I
> think the original fuel shut offs, with their reserve function,
are
> neat too. Hey, it was a good enough system for Porsche. I also
like
> a smooth clutch and a dry car. I balance these needs with my
desire
> to keep the car as original looking as possible. None of my
> modifications require any additional holes in the car. In fact,
my
> modifications don't require any changes at all that couldn't be
put
> back to completely stock condition if one should desire to do so
in
> the future. Things I do improve performance but don't change the
car
> from it's original appearance. I understand some people want to
make
> big obvious changes but that's not me. I also know people who are
so
> into stock that they would rather have the cheap original interior
> (even with tears) than a new, marine vinyl interior. That's not
me
> either.
>
> I did wonder about that little tube from the defroster duct to the
> bilge blower and never could figure it out. Inside the blower
> housing there is a divider plate that separates the fan section
from
> the motor section. That tube goes into the motor section and
doesn't
> really get any air movement at all. It certainly doesn't provide
any
> air into the main stream. All that air comes from the larger tube
> down in the bilge. After seeing the thread about it I called Hugh
to
> see if he knew anything about it. He doesn't. It's just a
mystery I
> guess. My best guess is that they wanted to allow any ozone from
the
> motor brushes to be able to get out of the housing since ozone is
> corrosive. Really though, that seems a bit lame. I've never seen
> such a thing any other places motors were enclosed. In fact the
> motor in that blower is pretty much a sealed unit anyway and I
don't
> remember seeing any openings in it's housing.
>
> John Friese
>
> --- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "WB6WSN" <wb6wsn@c...>
> wrote:
> >
>
 
J

John Friese

Guest
Hello Mark,

Thank you for the kind comments.

I drive my Amphicar harder than anyone out here in California.
Becuase of this I'm particularly interested in having the cars be a
good, reliable performers. I recently drove one of my Amphicars from
Santa Barbara to San Diego and back in one day. That's about 5 hours
each way with much of the trip at around 80 MPH.

Both of my Amphicars use a Pertronix ignition module and I like them
a lot. They do away with all side loads on the distributor shaft and
don't require any adjustments other than the normal timing
adjustment. I've used them for about 3 years now and had no problems
at all with them.

My engine rebuilder suggests that I use regular motor oil until the
engines are completely broken in and then switch to synthetics for
their better lubrication qualities and resistance to thermal
breakdown.

Thanks,

John Friese
67 White
67 Red






--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "markr132001"
<westlake5@c...> wrote:
>
> John,
>
> Your performance enhancements have proven to be some of the most
> beneficial in my humble opinion to the operation of a 50's designed
> Amphicar in todays driving enviornment. You are my Amphibion of the
> year nominee. (got that John?)
>
> I will continue to support you by buying your innovative and
problem
> solving solutions to the Amphi as it competes on the road to the
> average vehicle (other than a tractor).
>
> I use Amsoil products, including the oil with no problems. I change
> it every 3000 miles or 10 years, which ever comes first. Just
> kidding.
>
> My 1500 Spit motor is at the shop right now for final assembly. I
> had a guy call the other day (I work at Wells Ignition Products)
who
> converts points distributors to electronic, and he had nothing good
> to say about the Petronix units in general. He has seen many
> failures in the GM versions and gives them a low mark for
> reliability. Seeing nothing here, I am stumped, except that very
few
> are converted and low miles are clocked on the units.
>
> Given to the fact that I will buy one, I have been wondering if
> there have been any documented failures.
>
> No longer in Tennessee, I am the Wisconsin Winnebago Amphi Man
> wishing all a happy turkey day.
>
> Later, Mark Richardson
>
>
> --- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "John Friese"
<jfriese@m...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Ed,
> >
> > Yes, I spend a lot of time thinking about improvements for the
> > Amphicar. Generally I spend the most time trying to work on
items
> > that have been real problems for owners like the clutch system,
> > negative ground conversions and various water sealing issues like
> > door seals and the large style bilge plug. I really like to have
> > things like the gas gauge work correctly and read accurately. I
> > think the original fuel shut offs, with their reserve function,
> are
> > neat too. Hey, it was a good enough system for Porsche. I also
> like
> > a smooth clutch and a dry car. I balance these needs with my
> desire
> > to keep the car as original looking as possible. None of my
> > modifications require any additional holes in the car. In fact,
> my
> > modifications don't require any changes at all that couldn't be
> put
> > back to completely stock condition if one should desire to do so
> in
> > the future. Things I do improve performance but don't change the
> car
> > from it's original appearance. I understand some people want to
> make
> > big obvious changes but that's not me. I also know people who
are
> so
> > into stock that they would rather have the cheap original
interior
> > (even with tears) than a new, marine vinyl interior. That's not
> me
> > either.
> >
> > I did wonder about that little tube from the defroster duct to
the
> > bilge blower and never could figure it out. Inside the blower
> > housing there is a divider plate that separates the fan section
> from
> > the motor section. That tube goes into the motor section and
> doesn't
> > really get any air movement at all. It certainly doesn't provide
> any
> > air into the main stream. All that air comes from the larger
tube
> > down in the bilge. After seeing the thread about it I called
Hugh
> to
> > see if he knew anything about it. He doesn't. It's just a
> mystery I
> > guess. My best guess is that they wanted to allow any ozone from
> the
> > motor brushes to be able to get out of the housing since ozone is
> > corrosive. Really though, that seems a bit lame. I've never
seen
> > such a thing any other places motors were enclosed. In fact the
> > motor in that blower is pretty much a sealed unit anyway and I
> don't
> > remember seeing any openings in it's housing.
> >
> > John Friese
> >
> > --- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "WB6WSN" <wb6wsn@c...>
> > wrote:
> > >
> >
 
R

Randy Bograd

Guest
Re: Re: Big Fire Hazard?

<table>
Mark,
I've used the Pertronix ignition for almost 2 years now. This summer I drove from Maryland to Celina, about 500 miles in 12 hours. No ignition problems at all. The return trip was fine, too.

Randy
Gaithersburg, MD

On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 02:16:52 -0000 "John Friese" <jfriese@mindspring.com> writes:
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 10px; PADDING-LEFT: 10px">
<tt>
Hello Mark,

Thank you for the kind comments.

I drive my Amphicar harder than anyone out here in California.
Becuase of this I'm particularly interested in having the cars be a
good, reliable performers. I recently drove one of my Amphicars from
Santa Barbara to San Diego and back in one day. That's about 5 hours
each way with much of the trip at around 80 MPH.

Both of my Amphicars use a Pertronix ignition module and I like them
a lot. They do away with all side loads on the distributor shaft and
don't require any adjustments other than the normal timing
adjustment. I've used them for about 3 years now and had no problems
at all with them.

My engine rebuilder suggests that I use regular motor oil until the
engines are completely broken in and then switch to synthetics for
their better lubrication qualities and resistance to thermal
breakdown.

Thanks,

John Friese
67 White
67 Red






--- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "markr132001"
<westlake5@c...> wrote:
>
> John,
>
> Your performance enhancements have proven to be some of the most
> beneficial in my humble opinion to the operation of a 50's designed
> Amphicar in todays driving enviornment. You are my Amphibion of the
> year nominee. (got that John?)
>
> I will continue to support you by buying your innovative and
problem
> solving solutions to the Amphi as it competes on the road to the
> average vehicle (other than a tractor).
>
> I use Amsoil products, including the oil with no problems. I change
> it every 3000 miles or 10 years, which ever comes first. Just
> kidding.
>
> My 1500 Spit motor is at the shop right now for final assembly. I
> had a guy call the other day (I work at Wells Ignition Products)
who
> converts points distributors to electronic, and he had nothing good
> to say about the Petronix units in general. He has seen many
> failures in the GM versions and gives them a low mark for
> reliability. Seeing nothing here, I am stumped, except that very
few
> are converted and low miles are clocked on the units.
>
> Given to the fact that I will buy one, I have been wondering if
> there have been any documented failures.
>
> No longer in Tennessee, I am the Wisconsin Winnebago Amphi Man
> wishing all a happy turkey day.
>
> Later, Mark Richardson
>
>
> --- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "John Friese"
<jfriese@m...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Ed,
> >
> > Yes, I spend a lot of time thinking about improvements for the
> > Amphicar. Generally I spend the most time trying to work on
items
> > that have been real problems for owners like the clutch system,
> > negative ground conversions and various water sealing issues like
> > door seals and the large style bilge plug. I really like to have
> > things like the gas gauge work correctly and read accurately. I
> > think the original fuel shut offs, with their reserve function,
> are
> > neat too. Hey, it was a good enough system for Porsche. I also
> like
> > a smooth clutch and a dry car. I balance these needs with my
> desire
> > to keep the car as original looking as possible. None of my
> > modifications require any additional holes in the car. In fact,
> my
> > modifications don't require any changes at all that couldn't be
> put
> > back to completely stock condition if one should desire to do so
> in
> > the future. Things I do improve performance but don't change the
> car
> > from it's original appearance. I understand some people want to
> make
> > big obvious changes but that's not me. I also know people who
are
> so
> > into stock that they would rather have the cheap original
interior
> > (even with tears) than a new, marine vinyl interior. That's not
> me
> > either.
> >
> > I did wonder about that little tube from the defroster duct to
the
> > bilge blower and never could figure it out. Inside the blower
> > housing there is a divider plate that separates the fan section
> from
> > the motor section. That tube goes into the motor section and
> doesn't
> > really get any air movement at all. It certainly doesn't provide
> any
> > air into the main stream. All that air comes from the larger
tube
> > down in the bilge. After seeing the thread about it I called
Hugh
> to
> > see if he knew anything about it. He doesn't. It's just a
> mystery I
> > guess. My best guess is that they wanted to allow any ozone from
> the
> > motor brushes to be able to get out of the housing since ozone is
> > corrosive. Really though, that seems a bit lame. I've never
seen
> > such a thing any other places motors were enclosed. In fact the
> > motor in that blower is pretty much a sealed unit anyway and I
> don't
> > remember seeing any openings in it's housing.
> >
> > John Friese
> >
> > --- In amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com, "WB6WSN" <wb6wsn@c...>
> > wrote:
> > >
> >



</tt>

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</tt>



</blockquote>
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M

Mike Israel

Guest
Re: Re: Big Fire Hazard?

Many Amphicars, including my own, have been fitted
with the Pertronix system and I have heard nothing but
good things. The other advantage they offer is that
everything fits under the distributor cap so you are
not reallly doing anything to take away from the
originality aspect. Comes in both a positive and
negative ground version as well.

I consider the Pertronix a "must have" upgrade to any
Amphicar. I give it high marks for performance,
reliability, and cost. They also have a big following
in the vintage Jaguar community.
 

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