anyone else heard of this

F

F M

Guest
Ok.... Here it is.

Has anyone heard about rust removal by soaking metal parts in a mixture of molasses and water for a couple of weeks.

I've seen the results, I was impressed


<hr size="1">Yahoo! Mail Mobile
Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your mobile phone.
 
B

Bill Connelly

Guest
<table bgColor="#c8e0d8" background="">
<font size="2">Ok.... Here it is.

Has anyone heard about rust removal by soaking metal parts in a mixture of molasses and water for a couple of weeks.

I've seen the results, I was impressed</font>
<font size="2"></font>
<font size="2">

From http://www.lametalsmiths.org/news/page9.htm:

</font>
<table cellSpacing="5" cellPadding="5" width="100%" border="1">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="100%"><font color="#800000" size="5">Why Molasses Gets Rid of Rust
</font>
http://staging.newscientist.com/lastword/</td></tr>
<tr>
<td width="100%">
<table cellSpacing="5" cellPadding="5" width="100%" border="1">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="100%">
<font color="#800000">Question
I have a friend who uses molasses to clean rust off old iron items collected from the bush. The rusty iron article is placed in a jar of molasses solution (nine parts water, one part molasses) and left for two weeks. After this time, the article comes out clean and almost shiny. What is happening here?

Answer
Molasses contains chelating agents. These are made of molecules that are shaped a bit like the claws of a crab--the word chelating comes directly from the Latin word chele, meaning claw. They can envelop metal atoms on the surface of an object, trapping them and removing them. Molasses owes its properties to cyclic hydroxamic acids which are powerful chelators of iron.

More of these compounds are found if the molasses is derived from sugar beet rather than cane sugar. The plants from which molasses is made presumably use these chelating agents to help them extract minerals from the soil. Interestingly, there are aerobic microorganisms that use similar cyclic hydroxamic acids to scavenge iron. So plants and microbes appear to use the same chelation strategy to obtain their daily ration of iron.

The same process is at work when you clean old coins with Vegemite or cola. The power of chelating agents also explains why the insides of tomato tins need to be lacquered. The citric acid in the tomatoes would dissolve the metal of the container if the lacquer were not present. Household cleaning agents, especially detergents and shampoos, also rely on chelation. These soften water to make it more effective during the cleaning process.

Chelation has its uses in medicine, too. EDTA or ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid is used as a chelating agent to control levels of calcium in the body and can reduce the effects of mercury or lead poisoning.

Ben Selinger, Department of Chemistry, Australian National University. Ben Selinger is the author of Chemistry in the Marketplace and Why the Watermelon will not Ripen in your Armpit (Allen & Unwin)</font>

Bill Alleman </td></tr></tbody></td></tr></tbody>
 
W

WB6WSN

Guest
<table bgColor="#c8e0d8" background="">
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<blockquote style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message -----
<div style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: black">From: Bill Connelly
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Sent: Friday, May 13, 2005 3:39 AM
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] anyone else heard of this


<font size="2">Ok.... Here it is.

Has anyone heard about rust removal by soaking metal parts in a mixture of molasses and water for a couple of weeks.

I've seen the results, I was impressed</font>
<font size="2"></font>
<font size="2">

From http://www.lametalsmiths.org/news/page9.htm:

</blockquote>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4">And for those of us who won't wait two weeks, you can just buy a gallon of muriatic (hydrochloric) acid, pour some in a glass bowl, drop in the rusty part, and stand way back. OTOH, don't try this at home. <g></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4">On a tamer path, there's a liquid called Evaporust, which smells like citrus (but has phosphoric acid), and is used by gunsmiths for delicate parts cleaning.</font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4">Ed
El Cajon, CA USA
67 Rust Guppy
</font>

<div style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"></font>
 
L

Larry & Nancy Solheim

Guest
. . . . or Naval Jelly or Ospho (you'll find it at the hardware or marine store)

--Larry

WB6WSN <wb6wsn@cox.net> wrote:
<blockquote class="replbq" style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<blockquote style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message -----
<div style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: black">From: Bill Connelly
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">To: amphicar-lovers@yahoogroups.com
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Sent: Friday, May 13, 2005 3:39 AM
<div style="FONT: 10pt arial">Subject: Re: [amphicar-lovers] anyone else heard of this


<font size="2">Ok.... Here it is.

Has anyone heard about rust removal by soaking metal parts in a mixture of molasses and water for a couple of weeks.

I've seen the results, I was impressed</font>
<font size="2"></font>
<font size="2">

From http://www.lametalsmiths.org/news/page9.htm:

</blockquote>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4">And for those of us who won't wait two weeks, you can just buy a gallon of muriatic (hydrochloric) acid, pour some in a glass bowl, drop in the rusty part, and stand way back. OTOH, don't try this at home. <g></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4">On a tamer path, there's a liquid called Evaporust, which smells like citrus (but has phosphoric acid), and is used by gunsmiths for delicate parts cleaning.</font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4"></font>
<font color="#0000ff" size="4">Ed
El Cajon, CA USA
67 Rust Guppy
</font>

<div style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"></font>

<tt>THE AMPHICAR-LOVERS LIST
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Before posting requests for information, please check the List
Archives:
http://www.escribe.com/automotive/amphicar/search.html
For more information about this List and other available services
visit:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amphicar-lovers/
To Unsubscribe from this List, just send a blank email to:
amphicar-lovers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
Any other issues may be addressed to the List owner (Mike Israel) at:
amphicar770@yahoo.com


</tt>

</blockquote>


<hr size="1">Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site!
 
Top