Adhesives, Lead Fill, Etc.

M

Mike Israel

Guest
Hi All,

When all the discussion was taking place regarding the
use of adhesives in lieu of welding, I decided to ask
the folks at Fusor. Their reply follows in a moment.

I also spoke with two of the instructors at McPherson
College regarding lead work. McPherson, is well known
as one of the leading institutions in automotive
restoration. They actually offer a 4 year degree in
automotive restoration (something I wish I knew about
when I was younger). Anyway, when McPherson
undertakes a restoration, one of the the first things
they do is to get rid of all the lead filler. They
believe that lead simply makes no sense. Not only is
there the hazmat issue but you can never get rid of
all the acid and it will eventually cause problems
with the paint which then leads to corrosion. They
feel that the modern body fillers and sealers, when
used properly, are a far superior solution. It is one
of those compromises to authenticity that they believe
makes sense. They were less enthusiatic when I
mentioned adhesives in lieu of welding. They do
prefer TIG welds on any body panels.

Anyway, back to the reply from Fusor...
====================
Hi Mike,

Thanks for your interest in FUSOR products. Our FUSOR
metal bonding adhesives are an excellent alternative
to MIG welding exterior non-structural, secondary body
panels like door skins, roof skins, quarter panels,
patch panels and rear body panels. These products
work very well on ground cold rolled steel and have
built-in corrosion protection at the
bond line.

We do not endorse using FUSOR products under the
"water line" mainly because of liability reasons.
However, previous studies show only
minimal adhesive degradation when exposed to severe
salt water conditions for eight continuous weeks.

Hope this helps.

Thanks for using Fusor!

Bob Zweng
Fusor Tech Service
(800) 234-FUSOR
 
D

David Chapman

Guest
<table bgColor="#ffffff">
<tt>> Anyway, when McPherson
> undertakes a restoration, one of the the first things
> they do is to get rid of all the lead filler. They
> believe that lead simply makes no sense. Not only is
> there the hazmat issue but you can never get rid of
> all the acid and it will eventually cause problems
> with the paint which then leads to corrosion. They
</tt>
<tt>Mike, that bloke is talking out his bilge !</tt>
<tt>The only reason not to use lead in the restoration of steel automotive bodywork is lack of skill (which indirectly also means time and money). There are many cars where lead was used in manufacture as long as 80 years ago and the finish and paint is still perfect. Re the hazard - you need to use gloves and only ever hand tools, ideally a mask as well but then plastic fillers include all sorts of nasties...</tt>
<tt>The material cost of lead is actually less than plastic fillers and if you have the skills it can be quicker to use as there is no mixing required - and less waste as it can be re-used. </tt>
<tt>The only problem is it takes a long time to learn how to use as the temperature band between hard and liquid is only a few degrees so you have to get it just right - then it spreads like butter. </tt><tt>If you can rotate the car so you are always working on a level and flat surface it is possible to get an acceptable result at home without too much skill but using it on a verticalpanel takes years of practice.Yes you have to be careful to remove the flux when finished but there are plenty of ways to sucessfully do that. </tt>
<tt></tt>
<tt>I think the real test is what is used in manufacture. The top end British and Italian makes still use lead in the production of new cars. It has vanished from mass market stuff but only because robot controlled precision welding makes it (and any other filler) unnecessary.</tt>
<tt></tt>
<tt>For our Amphicars lead should be used below the water line as amongst other benefits it is waterproof and if the panel gets hit it bends with the panel. However as it is difficult to find people who can achieve a "ready for paint" finish with lead on it's own it is then OK to use a small quantity of plastic filler and / or a high build primer on top of the lead. </tt>
<tt></tt>
<tt>Where you really have to use lead on Amphicar is for things like getting the door lines right. It also makes sense on the engine cover due to the amount of heat and flex.</tt>
<tt></tt>
<tt>David C in the UK</tt>
<tt><font face="Arial" size="2"></font></tt>
 
A

Al Heath

Guest
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Is it also appropriate to use Lead on the throttle? Seem like when both Deb and I take our cars to the lake, she always wants to go faster than me. Maybe I should put a little Filler under her pedal. <g>
 

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